The Potty Box – Review and Giveaway

The Potty Box Review and GiveawayToday we are reviewing the Potty Box – Complete Toilet Set.  I received a review sample from Emergency Zone  I agreed to review it because I wanted to see if it would deliver on the product features as named in the website:

  • Triple-wall heavy duty design
  • Light weight & compact storage
  • Easy to set up and reuseable
  • Biodegradable
  • Enough chemicals and liners for 10 uses
  • Each scoop of Blue Gel will treat up to 1 gallon of liquid waste
  • Designed to hold up to 250 lbs
  • Fits under your bed, in your trunk, or under your desk in your office

This is how the box looks like:

Pottybox1

You turn the box over and you can already see how it will be constructed.

Pottybox2

Here is a photo of the box with contents.

Pottybox3The potty itself comes with:

10 trash bags

1 red bag labeled “biohazard”

small roll of toilet paper

Blue Gel porta potty chemical

small bottle of hand sanitizer

Pottybox4The instructions on how to construct it are right on the side of the box.  The Potty Box is easy to assemble.  All you have to do is unfold the cardboard and insert the cardboard tabs into the grooves.   Then you take a trash bag and fit it over the opening and tuck it under the sides.  It is as simple as putting together one of those filing boxes at work.   I wondered whether this construction would be flimsy like the filing box.

Actually this box is much stronger and sturdier.

I had a few people in the family of varying builds and weights try it out (no one weighed over 200 lbs. in this test, so I cannot vouch for anything above 200).  The box shows it can support up to 250 lbs.

At first, I imagined the cardboard might cave in but actually, it held up pretty well.  Some of the ones who tried it said it was comfortable enough, and some felt it was tight.

The plastic bag cushions your tush somewhat against the edge of the box.

Another comment was “You can’t do #1 and #2 at the same time,” but that is just something that would have to be worked out individually.

The lid of the box also functions as a toilet lid.

What I liked about it was it was very compact and lightweight.  It is very easy to assemble.  I also has the basic supplies needed for hygiene purposes and it functions as described.

As far as emergency potties for an apartment, it is very space efficient, however there are other choices such as 5 gallon buckets if you wanted a multi-purpose item.  If you are someone who does not want to assemble a potty kit, and want something quick that you can store under the bed or furniture, then the Potty Box would be good to have.  I would advise storing lots more toilet paper than the one roll.  You’d also have to consider how many people would potentially be using it in an emergency and the number of times used – each box has enough supplies for 10 uses.

I think the Potty Box would be ideal for a car survival kit – I’d certainly be grateful to have one if I were stranded somewhere.  It would also make a great gift for a non-prepper who would otherwise not have any hygiene supplies for an emergency.

NOW FOR THE GIVEAWAY…

Emergency Zone is giving away one Potty Box.   Please answer the following question for a chance to win

 What is your biggest concern about hygiene in a disaster?

The winner* will be chosen at a random “Pick a Giveaway Winner” drawing on Friday,  August 29 at 8 pm Central.  *Winner will be notified via email.  Winner must reply to email notification within 48 hours or another winner will be drawn.

 

Vote for Me at Top Prepper Websites

 

 

Monday Musings 8/18/2014 – Tell Me What you Think!

Monday Musings 8172014This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Welcome to another Monday Musings, where we share interesting links as well as updates on the blog and preps.

First the blog updates…

This week I am supplementing my hygiene supplies:  picked up a couple of bottles of bleach from the one of the dollar stores, and added a few extra packs of toilet paper, and garbage bags that were on sale at the market.  Unfortunately garbage bags from the dollar stores fall apart too quickly and at the worst possible moment… trust me-I know.

There’s still a chance to win Countdown to Preparedness   The drawing is on Friday,  August 22 at 8 pm Central.  Please visit the link here.

What would you like to see in our posts?

I’d like to see what’s working and what’s not for our readers.  I can tell somewhat from the daily blog traffic and comments what articles are popular, but I’d like to do a better job for y’all.  Would you mind taking a quick survey to let me know?  I promise it won’t take too much of your time.

Survey Link

Don’t worry, I won’t take it personally.   Thanks for taking the time to respond!

Now for the links…

Ebola outbreak vastly underestimated, WHO says

Hospitals in the U.S. Get Ready for Ebola

Warning: The Coming Pandemic and How You can Prepare Yourself

Job = Just Over Broke

It’s Time for a Prepper Reality Check

Add Photos to Your 72 Hour Kit: 10 min Preparedness Project

The SAD Way of Preparedness Websites – Possibly An Analogy of the Preparedness Life!

Take care and have a great week everyone!

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

Vote for Me at Top Prepper Websites

How to Avoid Getting Hurt in a Riot

How to Avoid Getting Hurt in a Riot

If you live in a large city, the risk of a riot is always present.  Riots can be triggered by many reasons, from rowdy festival goers, the aftermath of a big game, , dissatisfaction with a verdict or official actions, and many others.   Even people who are lawfully congregating or holding a peaceful protest can unintentionally be swept up in a riot.

How do you prepare for a riot?

There is no telling when a riot can happen.  Because of the unpredictability, it is not one of the risks that people really think about when preparing for a disaster.  But there may be ways to avoid getting yourself or your family hurt if one erupts in your vicinity.

Mental preparedness

  • Consider the possibility.  Never think for a minute that this won’t happen to you.  If you live in a city, it can happen.
  • Stay calm.  If you start seeing things escalate in a crowd, resist the urge to panic.

Always be aware of your surroundings.

  • Don’t be one of those people who are tethered to their phone and never look up.
  • Listen to the news and know what’s going on before you venture out.
  • Scope things out, even when things look normal.
  • Know all the exits wherever you are.

Avoid the area

  • Don’t be a lookie-loo.  A lot of people get curious about what’s going on, and instead of avoiding the area, they will be tempted to go check it out, drawing them closer to the line of fire.
  • Resist the urge to take pictures.
  • As soon as you become aware of something developing, start moving in a calm, orderly fashion.  You would not want to stumble and get trampled
  • Move in the same general direction of the flow of traffic, until you can veer off to a safer area.  Moving against traffic will be much harder, attract attention, or make you a target.

 Don’t attract attention

  • Keep your head down
  • Do not get involved.  You may agree with one side or other, but if you are trying to keep yourself or your family safe, now is not the time to get caught up.

Stay close to your companions

  • Kids can easily get separated from their parents in a riot.  If you have kids with you, keep a tight grip on them.  You may have to carry the smallest one.  In shopping malls, have seen parents doing a fast walk with kids struggling to keep up behind them.
  • If you are with others, try to stay close or within earshot of each other.

Items to have on hand

  • Have cash and change at all times so you can arrange for transportation if you can’t drive or get to your car.
  • Keep a pair of comfortable shoes in your car or in your office.
  • Many stores shut down if they are in the middle of an afflicted area.  Have a week to two weeks worth of food and water in your home, same as preparing for any disaster.

If you are driving

  • Know alternate routes home – it would best to avoid main roads and instead take side streets.
  • Lock your windows and doors.
  • Watch out for pedestrians – there may be a lot of people milling around or trying to stop traffic.
  • Always keeps your gas tank at least half full – you don’t want to have to stop for gas at the worst possible moment.
  • Have extra food and water in the car, along with a survival kit.
  • Leave as soon as you can or you may get caught in a traffic nightmare.

Sometimes, trouble can erupt around you.  The key to staying safe is being mentally prepared, and knowing what to do.

Stay safe!

 

 

 

Start Now for Fall Onions

 

onion field

Onions are a great crop for your home vegetable garden. You have plenty of choices, and they are very easy to grow directly from seed. Onions are also an excellent candidate to grow in containers, as some varieties such as the bunching types, take up very little space.

It’s now August, and most onion varieties need a minimum of 60 days to mature. That will take you to the end of September, beginning of October. In some areas, that may be past the frost date. That is ok. Throw a cold frame over your onions, some row covers or a garden cloche and you will be able to protect your onions. Some varieties may not even need that.

PLANTING DEPTH
I always describe onion seeds as “miniature pieces of coal.” At least that is what onion seeds look like to me anyway. With that said, they are a decent sized seed, needing only to be planted at about a ½” deep. If you are using containers with a peat based mix, you can go a bit deeper. That type of soil is very loose and friable and will not present any germination issues.

SEED SPACING
When direct sowing your seeds into your garden, which is what you can do right now, the spacing will depend on the variety. If you are planting a bunching variety, 2” to 4” is all you need. If you are going with a variety that will grow a bit larger, such as a red burgundy or yellow Spanish, I recommend 6” to 8”.

GERMINATION
Under optimal conditions, perfect weather, excellent soil, and so on, I have experienced onion seeds germinating in as little as 5 days. That is not the norm though. Ten to fifteen days to germination is more likely and more common. Mix in plenty of compost and hydrate your seeds first to help increase germination rates.

onions_growing_in_containerDAYS TO MATURITY
As noted earlier your onions will need 60 days. That does not mean, if you harvest on day 59, they are inedible, it simply means, to reach full growth, 60 is the average optimal time frame. You may need more time, or you may, with good soil and fertilization, get your onions sooner.

LOCATION
When picking a spot to grow your onions, choose a location that receives full sun. Onions can grow in partially shaded areas; however you are up against the Mother Nature clock here. Full sun will do wonders for growing onions if you have the space available to accommodate.

DRAINAGE
Onions are a root crop, so good drainage is very important. Too much water sitting around the roots can cause your onions to rot. If your soil is too dense i.e. has too much clay etc., mix in some peat to loosen it up, or add in loads of compost. This will help water drain away much better without leaving the soil area too dry.

CARE
As with any of your vegetable plants, keep the weeds away so your onions are not in competition for the soil’s nutrients. Weeds normally win. Be sure to feed weekly with a good fertilizer, or add in compost around the base of your plants. A light daily watering is all you need.

I don’t have to go through all of the culinary uses for onions as they are used in a lot of various recipes. Just know that not only do they add flavor to your favorites dishes, they contain calcium, iron and a good amount of vitamins, A, B1, B2 and C.

About the Author

mypic

Mike Podlesny is the author of the book Vegetable Gardening for the Average Person as well as the creator of the Seeds of the Month Club where members receive non gmo, heirloom variety seeds every month. You can listen to Mike each week on the Vegetable Gardening Podcast where he interviews gardening industry experts.

When There is No Coffee

When There is No Coffee

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

I’ve had a splitting headache since this morning.  I’ve tried natural cures, then taken Excedrin for Migraine, then later Aleve, but nothing has helped.  I was thinking “Why do I have this headache?,” then I realized I got busy and didn’t get my coffee this morning.  I always have two cups.  Now I am paying for my oversight.

This got me thinking, if there is a disaster and we can’t get our morning coffee, there would be a huge number of sufferers like me.  Mr Apt Prepper keeps telling me it’s time to wean myself off, but I am not ready.  What are our options?

1.  Stock up on coffee (and the water to brew it!)

Green coffee beans

Green coffee beans last much longer than roasted ground coffee.  My favorite is Kona coffee.  I keep a small amount with my food storage.  One of the first things I learned was how to brew coffee off grid.

Instant coffee

When I go camping or backpacking I bring the little instant Starbucks packets as they are lightweight and flavorful.  I have even tested the expired ones, and they turned out fine.  I have a about a week’s worth.

Don’t forget to stock up extra water to brew your coffee.  As we are learning from the recent water emergencies such as the one in Toledo Ohio, threats to tap water can occur at any time.  Make sure you stock up on water.

Tip:  Make your supplies last longer by using less and avoiding waste.  Some ideas:  Make iced coffee from the previous day’s old coffee.  You can also freeze leftover coffee or iced coffee and use to cool your next batch.  You can also stretch coffee grounds by reusing them the next day and using a quarter less grounds for the next day’s brew.

2.  Stock up on other caffeine sources

Tea

Like Captain Jean-Luc Picard of Star Trek The Next Generation, I prefer Earl Grey, and keep a box just in case.  I also have some Chai and black teas as backup.

Colas and other sodas with caffeine

I am not much of a soda drinker, but Coke, Barq’s Root Beer and Mountain Dew are examples of sodas that contain caffeine.  They may be an alternative for some.

Energy drinks

Red Bull and other energy drinks also contain caffeine.  But you have to watch your intake, as some have additional additives that cause rapid heartbeat or high blood pressure.

No Doze

Pills would not be my choice, but for long drives and having to stay up all night, they may be necessary to stay awake.

3.  Herbs or energizing herb teas

Certain herbal supplements and teas are known to boost energy such as ginseng, yerba mate, ashwagandha.  (When taking herb teas or supplements, be aware of both benefits and/or side effects.)

I have tried alternatives such as dandelion tea, which has a lot of health benefits, but I have not found one that is as satisfying as my morning coffee.  Flowers like hibiscus can be made into teas as well- see hibiscus tea recipe here.  Of course if it were grid down SHTF type situation, I am sure I’d be grateful for anything, even pine needle tea which I have brewed as well.

4.  Slowly give up the coffee habit

A co-worker of mine who used to drink two cups of coffee daily like me slowly got himself off.  He switched gradually to one cup of coffee a day for a couple of weeks, then switched to tea.  In another week or two he switched to herb teas and no longer craves the caffeine fix.

I’ve actually cut down from my previous four cups to two cups, but that’s as far as I got.

My excuse is, I don’t smoke, drink or shop for recreation, so I allow myself this one indulgence.  I just have to make sure I make it a point to keep adding to my emergency stash.  Even if nothing happens, I know it won’t be wasted.

 © Apartment Prepper 2014

Monday Musings: 8/4/2014

MondayMusings 08032014This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Welcome to another Monday Musings, where we share interesting links as well as updates on the blog and preps.

First the blog updates…

Blog makeover!  It’s taken me a while, but I made a few changes.  As you can see the blog looks different.  I changed the header photo, background, as well as added social media buttons to the articles and the side bar.

I also added a new tab “Don’t Miss These Posts” that shows Top Posts and Pages for the past year.

Giveaways

PowerStrips giveaway was won by Colleen who has been notified.

We have some great giveaways going on this week:  Don’t forget to enter the Water Brick giveaway announced earlier today, as well as the giveaway for The Prepper’s Blueprint by Tess Pennington.

Now for the links…

I mentioned this last month:  the new series featuring friend of the blog, Creek Stewart, who runs Willow Haven Outdoor.  The new show is called “Fat Guys in the Woods” and it premieres this Sunday, August 10th at 10:00 p.m. ET on The Weather Channel.  I am looking forward to seeing the show – here’s an early review from EdthatMatters:

Fat Guys in the Woods

Average Price of Electricity Climbs to All-Time Record

Budget Bug Out TentCopyright © GeekPrepper.org Read more at: http://www.geekprepper.org/budget-bug-out-tent/

Budget Bug Out Tent

PREParedness Items to Get in the Back to School Sales

Budget Bug Out TentCopyright © GeekPrepper.org Read more at: http://www.geekprepper.org/budget-bug-out-tent/

Why Being a “Tree Hugger” Builds Self-Reliance

 

Take care and have a great week everyone!

 

Emergency Essential Deals

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

Body Armor
Your image alt-text here

“Concerned about Deterioration of the Economy” Interview with Tess Pennington, Author of The Prepper’s Blueprint

250x250-PreppersBluePrintI had the opportunity to read The Prepper’s Blueprint written by Tess Pennington and edited by Daisy Luther.  This is a huge book and it give you a wealth of information about preparing for any disaster.  Becoming prepared can be overwhelming but this book will walk you through what you need to know.

The Prepper’s Blueprint, offers a “no nonsense” guide to preparing for either short term or long term emergencies. The book is written in a friendly, non-judgmental tone; you feel like a friend is helping you get motivated. Tess Pennington knows of what she writes. I liked the practical advice and actionable steps that anyone can follow. This book is a keeper.

In addition, I also interviewed the author, Tess Pennington.  Tess has made the big leap that many of us can only imagine:  moving from life in the big city to a small town.   Even though we can’t move just yet, there are many things we can do to live more sustainably while living in the city.  Read on…

1.  There are multiple threats to prepare for – what are you most concerned about?

My largest concern is with the deterioration of the economy. Currently, 1 in 4 Americans have no emergency savings. Emergency savings is hard to do when the country is in such a fragile economic state. Americans are struggling and finding ways to cut corners and learn to make ends the best they can. We are dealing with an epidemic of unemployment, the amount of families on food stamps is staggering, and it is becoming clear that an economic recovery is nowhere in sight.

Many years ago, I was enslaved to debt, we had no savings, I had no preparations and my young children were depending on me to get them through. My husband and I made some abrupt changes. We consumed less and worked at paying off our bills. Rather than taking vacations, we invested in emergency supplies and began growing our own food sources. I wouldn’t say that we are 100% self-reliant, but we are close to being debt free and are closer to our goal. One aspect of preparedness that is not discussed often is the time involved in accumulating supplies, learning the pertinent skills and becoming confident in your abilities. This takes years and those who are new to prepping may become discouraged in the process. The best way to approach prepping is with open eyes and new mindset.

If we can each take steps to eliminate debt, save money, simplify our lifestyle and prepare for the unexpected disasters that life can throw at us, then when those emergencies do happen, we will be prepared and ready to face them head on. We will not be as dependent on the economic cycles.

2.  What was a driving reason to leave the city and relocate to a different location?

Our driving reason was that the life in the city/suburbs didn’t reflect what we wanted anymore. We were ready to get some land and practice a more self-reliant lifestyle. Luckily, my husband and I work from home, so we were able to be picky about where we moved to. Not many people have the opportunity to pick up and move. Where our job is usually reflects where we can and cannot live.

For us, living in Houston, TX came with certain concerns. This is a densely populated area, crime rates seemed to be increasing, and there were concerns of multiple natural disasters and man-made disasters that we didn’t want to subject our family to. When we made the decision to move, we did a lot of research on areas around the country that were not densely populated, were rich in natural resources and didn’t pose as many natural disasters compared to where we were living. One resource that was exceptionally helpful during this research period was http://www.city-data.com/.

3.  What was the most difficult adjustment you (or your family) had to make?

In all, I feel that the adjustment was easy because I had done a lot of research in homesteading and self-reliance living. I knew going into it that there were going to be some challenges and learning curves. I wanted to get my hands dirty and knew that mistakes were all part of the process.

The most difficult thing I have found about the whole process is not be complacent. We get comfortable with things, maybe a little cocky in learning new skills and then you just stop learning, stop reading about new products and perhaps, become less open to new ways of thinking. In my experience, you should always be continuing to learn and train your skills. Find people around you or online that share your interests and learn from them.

4.  What steps can be taken to ease the transition when you move away from convenient and familiar surroundings?

When you make the decision to move away from all that you know, it can be scary at first. You may doubt yourself and your abilities. But, don’t give up! As mentioned above, my husband and I did a lot of research on where we were moving and had a plan of action before we moved. I had my checklist of things to do before I left.

My biggest advice for this question is to trust in your decision and give yourself time to adjust and acclimate to your new surroundings. One of the first things I did when we moved was start getting my garden set up. I am one of those people who have to have a garden growing. It calms me and gives me time to myself. You could also join local grounds (master gardeners, go to the gun range, meet up groups, etc.) to get you meeting the locals.

5.  Many families are unable to move out of the city due to financial and family reasons – what would you recommend in their situation?

Roughly, 80% of the population is urban, so you aren’t alone. There are many things you can do to promote a more sustainable lifestyle while living in the city. Make the best of where you are and refine skills you can use in an urban setting. Some great skills you can easily learn are:

Raise micro-livestock
Garden and produce your own food supply
Forage for local plants and herbs
Learn about Hydroponic/Aquaponic food production
Train your physical body in the event of evacuations
Take an emergency first-aid class or self-defense class
Start a prepper’s pantry and store shelf stable foods
Learn how to preserve your food supply
Go to farmer’s markets and get in contact with local growers and practice bartering
Visit self-reliant or prepper expos and take some prepper classes

Many families have to stay in urban areas but do not let that stop you from your prepping endeavors. There are lots of things you can do and many people who are in the same place as you with the same interests. Hopefully, the above suggestions can help you get started.

Now for the giveaway…

Tess is giving away a copy of The Prepper’s Blueprint to one lucky winner.

To enter, just comment on the question below:

Describe what skills are you trying to acquire to live more sustainably and why?

The winner* will be chosen at a random “Pick a Giveaway Winner” drawing on Saturday, August 9th at 8 pm Central.  *Winner will be notified via email.  Winner must reply to email notification within 48 hours or other winners will be drawn.

 

© Apartment Prepper 2014

Please click here to vote for me at Top Prepper Websites!

 

Why You Should Keep Tarp in Your Survival Kit

Why You Should Keep Tarp in Your Survival Kit A few weeks ago, we took a day trip to a wilderness area for a picnic.  There was no rain in the forecast that day, and there were no clouds in the sky when we set out.  After an hour’s drive, we arrived and scoped out a spot by some trees.  A couple of hours later, the clouds started coming in.  Pretty soon the sky was dark and you could just feel a slight cool down in the temperature, which signifies rain.  The wind came in and we knew we were about to have a downpour.  We didn’t want to leave just yet, so Mr. Apt Prepper rigged up a tarp into a makeshift shelter.  Paracord came in handy for tie-ups.

It was not a very attractive set-up but it kept us from getting drenched.  The rain lasted for about 45 minutes then the sun came out.

I was glad we had the tarp and paracord to build a makeshift shelter.  I have written about paracord before, but not about tarp.

Mutiple uses for tarp:

  • Barrier under a tent floor to protect you from sharp rocks or critters
  • Blanket to keep warm
  • Picnic blanket
  • Use as a hammock
  • Improvise a stretcher to carry an injured person
  • Use as a surface to field dress game
  • Make a shelter to protect from rain or to get some shade
  • Protect your car’s seats from messes
  • As a wrapping for stuff
  • Assemble into a backpack with paracord straps
  • As a covering for items carried on top of your car or truck
  • For camouflage if it is has the right colors
  • Make a sail
  • Catch rainwater:  dig a hole in the ground, line it with tarp and collect water.  It can also be used to direct the flow of water into a container
  • Protect your floor while doing a paint job
  • Use as a way to signal – if you are lost somewhere, find an area to spread out the tarp so it can be seen from above.
  • Makeshift shower curtain
  • Privacy screen for an outdoor toilet
  • Make an indoor fort for kids to entertain themselves during a power outage
  • Covering for windows

Keep some tarp, along with paracord and some duct tape in your car survival kit.  While you’re at it, might as well keep one at home and in your bug out bag.

 

 

All Natural Pain Relief PowerStrips Test + Giveaway

Before All Natural Pain Relief PowerStrips became a sponsor, I tested the product for myself to see if it works.

What are PowerStrips?  PowerStrips is an over the counter pain management product.  It is an adhesive strip that contains fermented red Korean ginseng, colloidal silver, Alpha 3 CMP marine phytoplankton and germanium.

How to use PowerStrips

They are simple to use:  Just peel off one side of the backing, apply the sticky side to the affected area, smooth it out.  Then peel off the other side of the backing and press down some more.  Keep it on for one to two days at the most then replace.

The Test

I was having some pain on my right knee after starting a running program.  I had it checked out and the doctor suggested wrapping it for support and taking some over the counter pain reliever.  I didn’t want to keep taking Advil or Tylenol, so I tried out the PowerStrips.  I am the skeptical sort and always test out products I mention, and I was trying out the PowerStrips before they became a sponsor.

First thing I noticed when I opened the package was a slight pungent scent.  The best way to describe it is, it smells like herbs.  (I’m told the scent is from the Fermented Red Korean Ginseng ingredient.)

I applied the PowerStrip on the knee and waited.

After about an hour I could feel the knee pain easing up.  I could actually feel some relief from the pain, just as I would have had I taken the Advil or aspirin.  I left the strip on for a couple of days.

After that I knew it was time to replace it, as I was starting to feel some discomfort.  I replaced the strip and again, I felt better.  My knee is better these days; but if they act up again, I would use PowerStrips all over again.  (Note:  I am not a medical professional, so if you have chronic pain, see a doctor – this article is just to relate how this particular product worked for my knee pain.)

I don’t mind taking one or two OTC pain relievers such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen but taking too many pain relief pills for an extended period of time can cause life threatening illness such as heart or circulation problems, intestinal bleeding, liver problems etc.

I was telling my brother about them and interestingly enough, it turns out one of his colleagues swear by PowerStrips for his chronic back pain.  I think PowerStrips provide a good alternative for pain relief.   They are light-weight, easy to use and have a two year shelf life.  For these reasons, they would make a good addition to your first aid and emergency kit.

Now for the giveaway…

We are holding a giveaway for the All Natural Pain Relief PowerStrips.  Please leave a comment below:

What chronic pain or condition would you try out PowerStrips for?

The winner* will be chosen at a random “Pick a Giveaway Winner” drawing on Wednesday, July 30th at 8 pm Central.

*Winner will be notified via email.  Winner must reply to email notification within 48 hours or another winner will be drawn.

ALL NATURAL PAIN RELIEF

THIS GIVEAWAY HAS ENDED.

Please click here to vote for me at Top Prepper Websites!

Learn Survival Skills

Own the Summer of Survival Complete Collection - Your Survival Skills Library

 

 

Fire Roasted Vegetables for Food Storage

Mountain House Fire Roasted Veg Blend4At last week’s Monday Musings, I mentioned I was catching up on product reviews.  Therefore, in lieu of the scheduled posts, this week is Review Week!

I had the opportunity to test out the new Mountain House Fire Roasted Vegetables.

Mountain House Fire Roasted Veg BlendLong time readers know we’ve tested a few Mountain House entrees, and brought them on camping and backpacking trips.

I was a little iffy about how fire roasted vegetables would turn out, as this is one of my favorite foods and some restaurants don’t even cook them properly.  But I gave it shot so here’s the result.

Here is what the vegetables look as you open the packet.  It contains freeze dried fire roasted bell peppers, onions with corn and black beans.

Mountain House Fire Roasted Veg Blend2

As usual, I followed the instructions to take out the oxygen absorber then just add 1.5 cups boiling water.

Mountain House Fire Roasted Veg Blend3Then mix up the contents to make sure the water has covered the vegetables.  Then seal up the bag and wait.  The directions said leave it alone 7-8 minutes.

I checked it after the 8 minutes were up and the vegetables were ready the the black beans were still a bit tough.  So I left it for another 7 minutes for a total of 15.  By now the black beans were perfect.

Mountain House Fire Roasted Veg Blend5I tasted the vegetables and they were excellent.  They had a sweet, fresh taste and a firm, not mushy consistency.  The pouch contains 2.5 servings.  I had it plain for lunch and it was satisfying.

I think it’s actually better than some of the frozen fire roasted vegetable blends I’ve tried from the supermarket.  They would be great for camping, backpacking and long term food storage.  I highly recommend Mountain House Fire Roasted Vegetables.

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared