Fight for Real Net Neutrality

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tumblr_inline_nbcf2gqnSg1r1kl7dThis post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Today we’re taking a break from our normal preparedness articles to discuss a very important issue:  the battle for net neutrality.  You may have heard that Sept. 10, 2015 is Internet Slowdown day, when several companies who want to keep an open internet join together to urge Washington to preserve the internet.  You will notice many sites will load very slowly – if you haven’t seen it, just click on my old site – http://apartmentprepper.wordpress.com  No, I’m not trying to generate traffic for the old site – it is no longer maintained, just using it for illustration.  The slow loading time will show you what will happen if cable and telecom companies get their way:  the ability to regulate internet speeds for different users.  Imagine if this happened to all your favorite sites on a daily basis.

What is net neutrality?

It is the idea that all broadband and cable providers must treat all internet traffic the same way.  This is how the internet has been since the beginning and now the FCC is considering allowing big cable and broadband companies to choke up traffic and allow fast and slow lanes for different users.

What this means is, companies like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon will be allowed to charge a company like Netflix and others for allowing access to their customers, resulting in fast loading times for certain users, and slow loading for us and everyone else.  Of course, those huge telecom companies support this, and are lobbying heavily to get these rules to take effect.

The little guys like you and me will be stuck in the slow lane of internet usage and your favorite blogs and websites will be left in the dust.

Part of being prepared is being aware of what’s going on around you, and the implications to your own life.  This is an important issue that will affect everyone who uses the internet.

Don’t let these companies force you into the slow lane of the internet.  Fight for net neutrality — visit battleforthenet.com, and let your voice be heard.

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

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Monday Musings 9/8/2014: Preparedness Updates and Links

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Monday Musings - Preparedness Updates and Links  09082014

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Welcome to another Monday Musings, where we share interesting links about all things  preparedness, as well as updates on the blog.

First the blog updates…

September is National Preparedness Month as we mentioned in yesterday’s post.

We’re having to look through our food storage to rotate items for freshness.  I hate to see anything go to waste, so we periodically go through our emergency items.  I know… I know, many food items can go well past their expiration dates, but how far past is safe?  No one really knows so I prefer to err on the side of caution.   What if you were relying on canned food that are five years past expiration, only to find out they emit ba bad smell by the time you open it?  Things would be much worse in a disaster when items are scarce.

Thanks for being our sponsor   A big thank you to Ready Made Resources for renewing their sponsorship with us!  Please continue to visit our sponsors  – they help keep the lights on at Apartment Prepper!

readymaderesources.com

Vote for me!  I got a really positive responses about Monday Musings when we ran our first poll ever.  If you like Apartment Prepper, please go out and vote for me!

Now for the links…

Mommy, I Have to Go Potty! Make Your Own Emergency Toilet

Drought in Spain means massive olive oil shortage in months ahead

“Grid Jihad”: What If You Had a Week to Prep for the End of the World?

The Escape Exercise

Recharge Alkaline Batteries

Looking out for your finances as a renter

Ten Steps To Turn Financial Disaster Into Financial Independence

Take care and have a great week everyone!

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

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Infographic: National Preparedness Month

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By Tess Pennington

(Editor’s note:  September is National Preparedness Month – we will post the basics about being prepared.  Today we are featuring an infographic that first appeared in Ready Nutrition)

Natural disasters seem to be more frequent and equally more violent these days. Yet the normalcy bias that has plagued our country continues. Many feel they are untouchable in terms of becoming a victim of a disaster. Little do they realize that disasters come in all shapes and sizes and typically do not make an announcement before entering your life.

Personally speaking, I have been through the aftermath of many disasters, both personal and natural. The aftermath does not take a few days for everything to get back to normal – it takes weeks if not longer to recover.

Anecdotes aside, this month marks a national 30 day endeavor to encourage citizens to be better prepared. I urge all of you to not fall into the percent of citizens who are not prepared. This infographic illustrates how massive these disasters can effect our personal lives, our jobs and our commerce. There are steps you can take to prepare yourself for your personal SHTF moment. It happens to all of us, better to be prepared than not prepared at all.

National Preparedness Month

Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

 

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SunJack Solar Charger – Product Review

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SunJack1 (5)I had the opportunity to test out the SunJack portable solar charger.  

What is the SunJack?

It is a portable solar charger by GigaWatt that can charge any USB device – phones, tablets, GPS, cameras, speakers, lights, and more.

Here is how it works:

The SunJack harnesses solar energy for direct charging or it can store power in a removable UltraSlim battery for use 24/7, rain or shine. After only 5 hours of direct sunlight, the 14 watt SunJack can power either 4 iPhones, 0.7 iPads or 8-9 hours of LED light using the SunJack USB CampLight. Unlike many other chargers, the SunJack kit includes a 1-2 batteries enabling you to simultaneously power 4 to 6 USB devices at a rate equal to on-grid charge speed (2 Amp).

Here is the SunJack right out of the box.

SunJack1 (2)

It comes with the four solar panels with USB charging unit, the battery pack, two carabiners and instructions for use.

I tried it out by leaving the SunJack outside on a small coffee table exposed to direct sunlight.

SunJack1 (3)You plug the battery to the charging unit and leave it alone in direct sunlight.

I left it out there for three hours

After three hours, I checked on the charge and found it was almost fully charged:

SunJack1 (1)There was only one more light indicator not lighting up at this point.    I asked my contact at SunJack about this and here is what he told me:

The last 20% charges a little slower to protect the battery and maximize the battery life. This is characteristic of Lithium batteries charge circuitry. Most likely if the battery is left in full sun for 5-6 hours the last led would also light up. 4 hours in full sun usually gets the battery 80% charged. Note this also occurs with iPhones as they charge to 80% really fast then charge speed slows down for last 20%.

It does make sense, as my own phone does the same thing.  After the final two hours, the fifth one lit up.

After the SunJack was fully charged, I charged up my phone and was pleased that the SunJack charged as quickly as am electric wall plug.  I’ve tested other solar chargers and the charging time is much slower than this one.  Granted, it was a smaller one with only three panels, but regardless, I was impressed at the fast charge of the SunJack.  Using the fully charged battery, I was able to charge my phone four times

The SunJack would be handy while camping to power up small devices – you can harness the power of the sun since you are outside already.  I think the SunJack is a great backup power source in the event of a power outage, or other emergencies.  As of this writing, it is available for $145 on Amazon and is currently on sale for $135 at LPC Survival.  The SunJack is well worth it.

 

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HTTP vs HTTPS and Why You Should Care

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The difference between HTTP and HTTPS and Why you should CareThis post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Yesterday, I got a couple of emails from readers that my site was not loading and people were getting an error message the site was not secure and another site name was popping up.  I immediately opened a priority ticket with my hosting provider to investigate the problem.  They looked into and they responded that the error would pop up if the reader tries to access the site using https://apartmentprepper.com instead of http://apartmentprepper.com

At this time, my site is accessible only http://apartmentprepper.com.  The reason the other site popped up was because the other site shares hosting space with me, and they are the only one that is accessible with “https.”

This brings me to my next topic, what exactly is the difference between HTTP and HTTPS?

HTTP stands for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol.  Most simple webpages use HTTP, especially if no financial transactions are done in the site.  In my case, I do not conduct any financial transactions on Apartment Prepper.  As you know my site is free and I am not trying to sell you anything directly.  I do have affiliates and sponsors, but those are not direct transactions.  Rest assured if I were to conduct any e-commerce in the future, I would make the switch.

HTTPS stands for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure. It is the secure version.  Sites that conduct financial transactions, or anything that involves personal information, such as banks, insurance companies, etc. use HTTPS.

So if you are about to give out confidential information, definitely check if the site is HTTPS.  Another indication the site is secure is when it has the padlock icon as you are entering your information.  But if you are just browsing through Apartment Prepper or your other favorite reading sites, then HTTP is just fine for that.

© Apartment Prepper 2014

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Monday Musings: 9/1/2014

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Welcome to another Monday Musings, where we share interesting links as well as updates on the blog and preps.

I hope you are having a nice Labor Day!  It’s hard to believe it’s already September.  I always feel time flies by even faster after the summer.  Before you know it, fall weather is here, then Halloween, Thanksgiving…   Then winter…  Christmas is right around the corner!
First the blog updates…

I’m getting to a busy time in my day job, so my blogging time is even more limited these days.  I’ll still be posting on a regular basis, I just may not be able to respond to all comments as I like to do.  Please be assured I read ALL comments.

Books I’m reading

Ultimate Preppers Guide

The Ultimate Prepper’s Guide: How to Make Sure the End of the World as We Know It Isn’t the End of Your World by Jay Cassell

Build the Perfect Bug Out VehicleBuild the Perfect Bug Out Vehicle: The Disaster Survival Vehicle Guide  by Creek Stewart

Ultimate Self SufficiencyThe Ultimate Self-Sufficiency Handbook  by Abigail R. Gehring

Who won The Potty Box?   Nicole won the drawing for The Potty Box.  In response to the question What is your biggest concern about hygiene in a disaster?  she said:

My biggest concern would be the buildup of said waste. Improper disposal can make to ground water, a human can only survive for three days without water in optimal conditions.

Now for the links…

Top 5 wilderness survival skills you need for urban survival

Butter Prices Reach All-Time High Amid Smaller Stockpiles

‘Just-In-Time’ Food Supply Disaster Is Looming

You DON’T know what will happen after SHTF so stop acting like you do

A Post-Summer Budget Plan for Building a Healthy Christmas Fund

Make Your Own Pill Bottle Survival Kit

 

Take care and have a great week everyone!

 

© Apartment Prepper 2014

Check out these deals!

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Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

17% off $100 + Buy 1 Get 2 FREE  + Free Shipping! Code: GET17PP. Puritans Pride Brand.

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Super Simple Tips to Trim Ounces from your Bug Out Bag

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Super Simple Tips to Trim Ounces from your BugOut Bag

Written By Morry Banes

What’s the difference between a really smart prepper and an average one?

Let me get straight to the point, I believe that a really good preppers out there take things a step further. That one extra step is being prepared for the fact that a real life situation will probably prove that you can never be completely prepared.  Sounds complicated but it really comes down to making your bug out bag (BOB) more flexible.
Do not take what I just said the wrong way and start packing things for every scenario that you can think of, but think in terms of what you can do to include things in your BOB that can be used in more scenarios.  This will help you trim weight off your bug out bag, making it easier to carry.

Let’s take a step back here and look at the basic things that are most likely in your BOB right now and see if we can spot places where you could’ve done a better job.  So, it all comes down to walking straight down that yellow brick road that stands between having a BOB that’s versatile enough on one side and having one that will be bulky and heavy and only make things more difficult on the other.

1. Water – you would think that everything there is to say about water needs has already been said, but we are looking at things from a different angle here, trying to trim down some weight and bulk.
We can’t shrink down our 3-4 liters of water but we can:

  • Use a collapsible water bottle to save space
  • Extend the life of our water purification filters by adding coffee filters

2. Food – Think dense. When I say “dense” I mean calorie density.  I am all for simplicity here – to cover my food needs my 3 day BOB only includes: energy bars, 3 cans of anything protein (one for each day) and a light backpacking stove.  It’s so easy to overkill with bulky backpacking meals.

3. Clothes – boots, military style pants, a poncho, 2-3 pairs of socks, 1 pair on long underwear and one pair of thermo skin tight underwear suit, 2 short sleeve t-shirts.
Mentioning thermo skin tight underwear here might raise some eyebrows, but it packs so small and can make so much of a difference that it’s shame not to have it there.
Most of the preppers I know and talked to had significant space to peel in their BOBs just by cutting down on those 5 t-shirts and that second pair of pants. A skin suit a huge space-saver and much more versatile.  And yes, if you don’t have a bandana in your BOB, it’s back to the drawing board for you.

4. Shelter and sleep – again, simplicity is key to effective packing. Two tarps, a thin foam pad and a light sleeping bag adjusted to the temperatures you are expecting. I’ll never get onboard with the concept of a tent in a 3 day BOB.  A simple tarp is much more versatile.

As I said, when thinking about your BOB, don’t list endless scenarios in your head but think about items that can cover scenarios you’ll probably never think of.  You might want to read that sentence again.

5. First aid – one more thing that I’ll never get on board with is getting a factory made, pre-packed first aid kit. Building your own kit will not only save you space but the research alone will develop neurological pathways that will just deploy in the time of need.

6. Tools – this one is a biggie. First of all it’s essential to get it right because it’s the “outer wall” of everything we talked about and secondly, it’s the single point that can shave the most weight of your BOB.  If you are thinking screwdrivers, scissors, knives, bottle and can opener, let’s take a step back.

How about a multi tool?   I have to tiptoe in my wording here because many preppers might be offended if I talk about a multi tool like I came up with the idea.  But you would be surprised how many people aren’t really awake to the true value of a multi tool, and a lot of those who are don’t give that much thought to two basic questions:
1. multi tool pieces vs. standalone pieces
2. survival knife vs. a multi tool

Let’s get some clarity here:   If you play your cards right and choose wisely you’ll probably be able to replace a lot of standalone pieces of tools like pliers and wire cutters with a single tool.  No beating around the bush, my BOB includes a regular heavy-duty multi tool, a medical multi tool and a survival knife.

Allow me to give you my reasons here that also might give you some pointers for choosing your tool:

  • I stay away from glitter and shine and go for sheer usability in a multi tool (think Leatherman and Gerber).
  • Scissors in a regular multi tool will never be sturdy enough for your BOB. So, I’ll need standalone scissors. But instead of getting regular scissors I go for a medical multi tool that comes with sturdy heavy duty scissors. This covers the scissors issue but gives you so much more.
  • There’s no way around a proper survival knife for your BOB. None of the blades in the multitools are not even close to being as sturdy as that in standalone knife.

Getting things right here will probably cut the weight of the tools you carry in half.
I promised some clarity so let me share my choices:

Gerber 600 with a blunt nose
Leatherman Raptor
SOG Seal pup knife

Final thoughts

You can trim some serious “fat” from your 3 day BOB just by rethinking a few things using the pointers I offered in this article.  The end result – a lighter more flexible BOB free of fluff that you’ll probably never use and packed smartly with things you’ll really need and use.

Live smart and survive smarter,
Morry

About the author:
Morry Banes is an blogger in the field of multi tools, safety and preparedness. He runs a multi tool blog at bestmultitoolkit.com.

Morry is an ex multitool factory worker and today he owns a small hardware store in Tigard, Oregon, collects multitools and shares his passion by writing about them.

 

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10 Easy Tips to Avoid Food Storage Problems

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10 Easy Tips to Avoid Food Storage ProblemsThis post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

A lot of people are now considering storing food for emergencies but feel they have obstacles that prevent them from doing so.  Perhaps they feel they don’t have any free space, or become overwhelmed by the task.

Having limited space and living in a hot humid climate for at least 120 days out of the year, I am very familiar with storage problems.

Ideally, food should be stored at around 50-55 degrees, with no more that 15% humidity.   Does that mean you cannot store food if you do not have these ideal conditions?  Of course you can!  The conditions described are “in a perfect world” type scenario, and we all know it’s not perfect, otherwise we would not need to store food.

Summer temperatures in Texas reach over 100 degrees with 80% humidity.  To save electricity, we keep the air conditioning at around 78-80 degrees.  The A/C cuts down on humidity, but moisture still seeps in.  This is something we cannot ignore.  We just factor in that the food stored will not last as long as it would have at cooler, drier temperatures.

Here are some tips:

  • Clear out an area before getting started, or as you supply grows.  Clean out the junk closet and sell or donate items, leaving free space for food storage.  Try using underutilized spaces such as under the beds, inside empty suitcases or TV cabinet.
  • Avoid waste and store only foods that your family eats.  Resist the urge to stock up on sale or discontinued items just because of the low price.
  • Choose canned foods that have the longest expiration dates.  Do not buy cans that are dented or misshapen even if they are heavily discounted.  Although some studies have shown they can last a few years past their expiration dates, I prefer not to risk it, especially after a friend’s unfortunate experience.  Getting ill from eating spoiled food is not worth it.
  • Rotate your food constantly.  I mark the expiration date with a Sharpie marker on top of the canned food and on the sides to make sure I use them before those dates.  At least twice a year, go through your supplies and use anything close to expiration.
  • If you are storing bulk foods in mylar bags, observe the proper technique by using oxygen absorbers and letting all the air out.  Label your buckets with the contents and the date the food was stored.  Plan on using these stored foods within five years, instead of ten, if your storage conditions are not ideal.
  • Find out that pests got into your stored food such as rice or flour would be disastrous, not to mention expensive to replace.  Clean the area surrounding your food storage thoroughly.  Make sure the area is dry and pest free.  For additional protection from pests, keep stored foods in five gallon food grade buckets with tight lids.
  • For maximum shelf life, choose dehydrated or freeze-dried foods.  Mountain House, a provider of food for recreational and emergency purposes, just increased their stated shelf life from 10 years to 12 years on their pouches.
  • If you are storing water in containers for drinking, use and replace the water after a year.  Mark the date of storage on the container using a label or sharpie marker.  Mold or moss may develop after the container been sitting in a warm, humid area for a while.  If you do use water that has been stored for a long while, have a backup water purification system by running it through a filter, boiling etc.
  • Make sure your food and water storage is not close to gasoline or other chemicals that emit fumes that will contaminate your supplies.

This tips will help minimize mistakes,  and ensure your stored food and water will be available when you most need them.

© Apartment Prepper 2014

Don’t let those expiration dates get past you.  An inexpensive but helpful tool to keep track of supplies:

 For beginning preppers

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Monday Musings: 8/25/2014

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Monday Musings 8252014This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Welcome to another Monday Musings, where we share interesting links as well as updates on the blog and preps.

First the blog updates…

Thanks for taking the survey!  We had a great week at Apartment Prepper.  A good number of readers responded they like Monday Musings “as is” with both blog updates and link sharing.  We also got some great suggestions for future posts and I am working on those articles now.  Thank you everyone for responding to our first poll!

Who won Countdown to Preparedness?  Kathi won the random drawing.  She left the following comment:

When I travel, I drive and am pretty well prepared from most things. Walking home wouldn’t be fun though.

Hubby flies to his jobs and refuses to do much in that regard. He does carry his meds in his carry on and that is an improvement. Sometimes, if he is going to be gone a couple of weeks, he will put his pocket knife in his checked bag.

Don’t forget to enter the Potty Box giveaway.  It’s going on now, and ends Friday, 8/29.

Now for the links…

New site that gives free resources: TopSecretSurvival.com

20 All Purpose Remedies Using Essential Oils

EMP: What You Need To Know To SURVIVE

What to Watch on Food Labels

Smart Survival Strategies for Kids: Forbidden Items at School

Is It Really That Easy to Live Off of Your Garden?

Take care and have a great week everyone!

© Apartment Prepper 2014

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Have You Seen the New Survival Show Fat Guys in the Woods?

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Fat Guys in the Woods

Fat Guys in the Woods, photo from The Weather Channel

“Fat Guys in the Woods” is a new survival show that appears on Sundays at 10:00 p.m. ET, on The Weather Channel.

Creek Stewart, photo from The Weather Channel

Creek Stewart, photo from The Weather Channel

For anyone who is not familiar with Creek Stewart, he runs Willow Haven Outdoor and is the author of Build the Perfect Bug Out Bag, The Unofficial Hunger Games Wilderness Survival Guide and most recently, Build the Perfect Bug Out Vehicle: The Disaster Survival Vehicle Guide  (I’m reading this right now).

I saw review copy of the premier episode of “Fat Guys in the Woods.”

In the show, Creek shows takes three average guys into the Smokey Mountains and teaches them survival skills. They then take what they learned and go off to survive on their own, using what they just learned.

The guys in the first episode were average guys who have let themselves go over the years.  You can tell they were getting winded after the long walk as they mentioned they were getting hungry.   It was not hard relate to these guys – I am sure I’d get hungry after a long trek as well. Creek explained their most pressing need was to build a shelter, since the temperature was likely to dip below 15 degrees F.  He then shows them how to build a shelter using branches and leaves, as well as a bed so the cold doesn’t seep all the heat away from their bodies.

Next, Creek shows them how to build a fire, using a flint and steel with char cloth. One of their tasks was to find their own flint, which was interesting to me.

The last lesson involved learning how to make a snare to trap an animal. When they finally trap a rabbit, Creek showed them how to field dress it and cook it.  It was remarkable how the guys were really appreciative of the simple meal they had – they even recalled previous meals where they barely remember what they ate with a table full of takeout food.

Creek is a likeable teacher; he patiently instructed the guys and was very encouraging to all of them. This “can do” attitude really gave the guys confidence in their own abilities.

I like the show.  Initially I had some doubts, as the title sounds a little sensational, but I found the show not only entertaining but also instructive. This is a show from which you can actually learn a thing or two. Sure, I would have liked more in-depth detail about how to build a snare but you can only fit so much information in one show.  Clearly, the experience was a positive one:  I liked how the outdoor experience made a lasting impression on the guys, motivating them to get into shape, become closer to nature and even accomplish more in their job.

I think this would make for a good family show, one you would not mind seeing with the kids, maybe not the smallest ones, but certainly age 8 and up would have a good understanding of the survival aspects.  Check it out tonight!

 


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