Monday Musings: 11/10/2014

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Monday Musings 11102014This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Welcome to another Monday Musings, where we share interesting links about all things preparedness, as well as updates on the blog.

First the blog updates…

We just had our biggest week here at Apartment Prepper in terms of visitors- my post Substitutes for Toilet Paper was the most shared ever, had over 11,000 views in one day, plus lots of comments.  Thank you to everyone who shared the post – I appreciate it!

This past week I have been busy testing gear for product reviews and catching up on reading.  Gear and book reviews are scheduled two to three months in advance in the blog calendar, to give me time to read, test and post about it.

I have not added any items to the stockpile, in fact, I have been using some of the supplies to supplement the weekly menu.  I’d like to replace the food storage soon, but money has been very tight at the Apartment Prepper household lately.   So we make do or do without.  You can bet I am collecting money saving ideas and will be posting about them.  In the meantime, I have a couple of links to frugal posts below.  I can certainly relate!

Practical Tactical posted a review of Jake and Miller’s Big Adventure.  Check it out here!

We have a great giveaway going on – don’t forget to enter!

Now for the links…

Mark Goodwin over at PrepperRecon released his new book, The Days of Noah Book One:  The Conspiracy  I had read his previous books, The Economic Collapse Chronicles which was a good series.  I am adding The Days of Noah to my book list!

Gaye Levy and George Ure’s book, 11 Steps to Living a Strategic Life: A Guide to Survival During Uncertain Times is on sale of just $0.99.  I reviewed this book – it has excellent and timeless advice for everyone.

No-Shopping November Day One

How to Make Mint Extract + 6 homemade extract recipes

20 Brilliant ways to use Paper Rolls (Paper Towel & TP Rolls)
The Budget is Getting Tighter! 15 Ways We Are Making Lincoln Scream and You Can Too!

Situational Awareness – Breathe Like A Navy SEAL

 Take care and have a great week everyone!

© Apartment Prepper 2014

Please click here to vote for me at Top Prepper Websites!

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Foodsaver Giveaway!

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FoodSaver Tips And Giveaway-Nov.10th-16th, 2014 by FoodStorageMoms.com
We have some FoodSaver tips and giveaway today! Have you been wanting a FoodSaver® Vacuum Sealer? Well, today is a sponsored post by FoodSaver® and we are so grateful to be able to share this giveaway with our readers! You can use FoodSaver bags, FoodSaver containers and mason jars to preserve your food for the pantry or freezer. This FoodSaver® Vacuum Sealer FM2000 comes complete with the following:

Included In Offer:
3 – Quart Bags
2 – Gallon Bags
1 – 11” x 10′ Roll
1 – Accessory Hose

We quote from the FoodSaver website “The FoodSaver® FM2000 Vacuum Sealing System keeps food fresh up to 5x longer and saves up to $2700 per year based on buying in bulk, on sale and preventing waste. Form and function combine with a sleek, compact design and easy-to-use manual operation to preserve a variety of foods.”

Tips

Use mason jars to make your breakfast meals, salads for a week, buy food in bulk and put in smaller FoodSaver bags or mason jars to store and save $$$$! Please share how you would use this awesome giveaway if your name is chosen as the winner.

Terms & Conditions:

This FoodSaver® Vacuum Sealer FM2000 Giveaway is open to any resident who is 18 years of age or older who lives in one of the 48 US Contiguous States. This giveaway starts on Monday, Nov. 10th at 5:00 am (MST) and ends on Sunday, Nov. 16th, 2014 at 5:00 pm (MST). The winner will be notified by email and will have 24 hours to respond. If we do not hear back from said winner in the designated time period of 24 hours we will choose another winner and they will have 24 hours to respond from the time the notification email is sent. Please check your SPAM email folders. Good luck to everyone! Let’s be prepared for the unexpected!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Can You Brew Coffee from Stale Green Coffee Beans?

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Can You Use Green Coffee BeansThis post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

A few years ago, when I first started my emergency stash, I bought green coffee beans as I was learning to brew coffee off grid.  The beans were purchased in 2010, and were left in the original packaging for the last four years.  I should have repackaged them in mylar bags, but sometimes even a preparedness blogger slips up.

Can You Use Green Coffee Beans 1I found them after we moved to a smaller space and was too cheap to throw them away.  This past weekend, I ran out of my favorite Dunkin Donuts coffee but did not want to break into my emergency supply of Kona coffee.  I thought, “Why not see if these old green coffee beans are still any good?”

What the stale green coffee beans looked like:

They are no longer green but almost look like peanuts:

Can You Use Green Coffee Beans 2

Roasting stale green coffee beans:

I used my cast iron skillet over a propane stove outside.

Can You Use Green Coffee Beans 3

After a few minutes, they started turning brown.  Then, they started smoking, and smelling slightly burnt.  Finally, they started making the popping sound, like popcorn, but not as frequent.

I was a little concerned the beans did not smell as strong as expected.  There was a slight coffee smell, but also accompanied by a toasty smell.  But I was determined to see them through.

I let them toast some more, and turned off the heat.  They do look brown with a slightly oily sheen as they’re suppose to look.  Then I placed them in a colander, shook them around a bit over the sink to let the chaff fly off.

Can You Use Green Coffee Beans 4After they cooled, I used the Nutribullet nut attachment to grind them.  They now smelled like real coffee.

Can You Use Green Coffee Beans 5I brewed the coffee using them the next day.   I would say the coffee aroma was not as strong as when they were fresh, but these are four year old green coffee beans.  I was actually surprised they were any good at all.

Can You Use Green Coffee Beans 6When I tasted the coffee, I found it tasted good; probably not as robust as they would have been had they been properly stored, but I can’t complain.  This experiment was to see if  it’s okay to brew coffee from stale, green coffee beans.  In answer to the question, I would say yes.  But if you want to maintain optimum quality and taste, then store them properly and they will last even longer.

© Apartment Prepper 2014

Please click here to vote for me at Top Prepper Websites!

 

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Substitutes for Toilet Paper

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Substitutes for Toilet Paper

I recently posted about being off-grid for 48 hours, and using a lot of baby wipes due to the lack of water during our adventure.  One thing that would run out quickly in a survival situation if you did not have a huge stockpile would be toilet paper.  Not having a lot of space we have about three months worth on hand right now, but that can run out quickly.  Also, a large stockpile of toilet paper is not portable in a bug-out situation, and in a shelter in place scenario, the TP supply is bound to run out.

Space saving tip:  Remove the cardboard insert and flatten the roll and you can fit more rolls in a small space.

What are some substitutes for toilet paper?

Back in ancient times, the Romans used a sea sponge on a stick.  They would clean themselves with it, rinse it in the running water (public bathrooms had them on the floor) and leave it soaking in salt water in between uses.

In colonial times, people used corncobs, and later, old newspapers and catalogs were used in outhouses.

Here are a few ideas:

1.  Wet wipes or baby wipes

These would work just like toilet paper, but again, a large stockpile would have to be accumulated.

2. Paper Substitutes

Newspaper may work, but the ink would turn everything black.   I read other people prefer The Yellow Pages but these days, a lot of people don’t keep phone books around.  Store catalogs may be more common, and flimsy pages instead of high end glossy paper would work best.  Just crumple up the sheet until it softens up, then wipe.

3.  Cloth

Cloth, such as wash cloths, terry cloth or  cloth diapers can be used as toilet paper substitutes.  You can even cut up old, soft t-shirts into squares.  If you want to make reusable cloth wipes, this article from Food Storage Moms has good instructions.  The method would be to wet the cloth, wipe, then launder the cloth.  Supporters of this idea feel that most people would have nothing against rewashing cloth diapers, therefore personal washcloths should be okay.  I would think it would be a good idea to throw the soiled wash clothes into a bucket of water with some bleach before washing.

4.  Plant material

Sage leaves are said to be soft and fragrant enough to use, some say banana leaves would work too..  You must have some knowledge about which plants are safe; you would not want to use something like poison ivy, poison oak or sumac by mistake!   Remember: Leaves of three – let it be!

5.  Water

Many countries already use a spray water fountain called a “bidet” as part of their bathroom facilities.  Since this is being considered in an emergency scenario, we would need an alternative to that too.  In many countries, use of the left hand in combination with pouring water in a pan or small bucket with the right hand is the way to clean up.

Possible water carriers:

Fill any of these containers with plain water, add a drop of essential oil for fragrance and wash up.  (Don’t use mint or and don’t overdo the quantity of drops, or you may irritate those sensitive areas.)  After washing, dry the area with a clean towel that can also be reused.

To avoid disease, one would have to wash the hands well with water or antibacterial gel right after.

I’m not ready to give up toilet paper but you gotta do what you gotta do to stay clean.   In an emergency, the water route seems like the most likely one to try.  I may try making those clothes one of these days.  We will keep stockpiling toilet paper for now, and store them efficiently by flattening them for maximum use of space.   Another idea would be to decrease the use of toilet paper by combining with the methods above, thereby extending the life of the stockpile.

Toilet paper shortages sounds unlikely, but it has happened:  a year or so ago, Venezuela faced a toilet paper shortage and the government had to take over a toilet paper factory.   Before I got interested in preparedness, I can recall snagging the last package of toilet paper and waiting in a long line right before a hurricane.  Toilet paper is one of the first items to disappear if a disaster disrupts supply deliveries.  It’s good to know some alternatives just in case.

 

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Monday Musings: 11/3/2014

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Monday Musings 11032014

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Welcome to another Monday Musings, where we share interesting links about all things preparedness, as well as updates on the blog.

First the blog updates…

I haven’t written a Monday Musings post in a while, since we had giveaways the last two weeks.  Next week we will have another one on Nov. 10th, and I don’t mind telling you we are planning a big one for Black Friday, November 28th.

Sponsor update:
A big “Thank You!”  to LPC Survival Home of the Berkey Guy for renewing with us.  They’ve been with Apartment Prepper since the early days.  Please visit our sponsors – they help keep the lights on around here!  Thank you!

Freedom Prepper Magazine – free trial!  One of my articles is featured in this month’s Freedom Prepper Magazine’s special ebola alert issue, available for I-Phone of Google Apps.  Apartment Prepper readers can try Freedom Prepper magazine for free for 30 days.  Note:  I do not have a financial relationship with Freedom Prepper, nor am I trying to influence you in any way.   This is just a freebie that is available so I am passing it along.  Here are the links if you are interested:

Now for the links…

13 REAL Survival Uses for Altoid Tins – You Can Easily Make One Today!

85 Ways to Eat More Fermented Foods

Pushing Past the Terrifying Dip in Motivation

33 Ways to Maximize a Small Living Space on a Budget

We Prep for Ebola Because of Irresponsible People Like Kacie Hickox

Nutritious Acorns Don’t Have To Just Be Snacks For Squirrels

5 Tips for Correctly Using Hand Sanitizer (From a Nurse Who Knows)

Hackers Probing Financial System’s Defenses Show Why Everyone Should Worry

Take care and have a great week everyone!

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

 

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Book Review: The Last Layover by Steven C. Bird

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the last layover

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

I had the pleasure of reading The Last Layover:  The New Homefront Volume 1 by Steven C. Bird as part of Survivor Jane’s preparedness books blog tour.

What is the book about?  The Last Layover is an e-book, a work of fiction in which an airline crew finds themselves in a grid down disaster while in a layover in New York City.  They must find their way back to their homes while dealing with violence, loss of infrastructure and chaos.

What I thought about the book 

I was very interested in reading the story, as the topic speaks to one of my fears:  being in a disaster while being far from home.   It was easy to place one’s self in the shoes of the characters.  I  liked the characters and agreed with their choices and actions.

The book initially covered much detail about flying and the piloting life.  While informative, I felt the background info was a bit too long.  I would have preferred more details about what caused the breakdown.  I wondered why the local police and sheriffs were strangely absent – the only detail given was they were protecting their families.  Perhaps some of the questions would be answered in the sequel.  I also felt the last part of the book seemed to be rushed, considering the hardships and roadblocks described getting from Delaware to Ohio, the trip from Ohio to Tennessee seemed to go quickly and without incident.

Overall, I thought it had a good story and I enjoyed reading it.  I thought the characters were very believable and it was easy to relate to them.  The book was fast paced and had enough action to hold my attention and I was able to finish it in a couple of days.  If you are looking for a quick and enjoyable read, I recommend you pick up The Last Layover. 

The Last Layover and its sequel, The Guardians: The New Homefront Volume 2 are available Amazon.

 

© Apartment Prepper 2014

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

 

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Off-Grid for 48 Hours

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Offgrid for 46 hours1This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Right before school started we decided to try being off grid and unplugged from all electrical devices for 48 hours.  Being connected all the time, I was a little apprehensive about not being able to check on the blog and being out of reach.  But I thought this would be a good opportunity to test our preps and ourselves.

What it was like to be off-grid for 48 hours

Our destination was remote and had no water except at the trail head where a water pump could be used.  A couple of families participated – we coordinated supplies to avoid bringing duplicates.  We left the GPS device behind.  We turned off our cell phones; but it would not have mattered as there was no cell service for miles around.

Getting There without GPS

We went during the middle of the week, so the area was deserted.  There was not even much street traffic on the route over.  Not having GPS, we had written out the directions.  We got to the small town just fine, then followed the signs.  However, we missed one of the turns and had to backtrack.  We eventually found the place and realized we had driven past the main road.

First lesson learned:  We have gotten overly dependent on GPS and relying on directions from the phone that we now second guess ourselves.  We were a lot more confident about directions when we relied on paper maps.

The Trek

We parked our cars at the bottom of the hill and found the marked trails.  It turned out the trail we intended to take was closed off, and there was no access.  We had to choose another trail which was a lot longer and steeper than the original one.  At this point it was 95 degrees out in the heat.  We had our packs, plus had to collect water at the only source before heading up.

Water is heavy!  Everyone from the oldest to the youngest carried a pack.  We took frequent breaks during the hike.  Because of the heat and humidity, it was hard to breathe while walking and carrying the packs.

Your pack’s weight starts to become really critical as you get more fatigued.  When we do this again, we will make sure to keep the packs a lot lighter.

Survival requires being in decent shape, especially if you have to find water.  Someone in our group started to suffer from heatstroke, as he alternately felt hot then strangely started feeling chilled.  We had to give him some wet bandannas to cool off, and lots of water to hydrate.

We did not expect the hike to take so long but the trail closure left us no choice.  Someone in the party was wearing athletic shoes instead of hiking shoes and he got major blisters during the long hike up to the camp site.

In a survival situation, it is best to wear the most comfortable footwear.   

Footcare is important in a survival situation and so is taking proper care of your shoes.

First Aid kit

We brought a standard first aid kit which came in handy for small cuts and blisters.  We also brought plenty of sunscreen and insect repellant.  If you try this, make sure you bring your prescription medications with you.

Shelter

We cleared an area set up our tents in a meadow-like area.  It also takes energy to clear an area and set up shelter, making us even more tired after the long hike.

Thank goodness we had set up the tents properly – the last night of our stay we experienced a spectacular thunderstorm with huge wind gusts that were quite threatening.  The rain and wind beat down on our tents for a couple of hours as we huddled in our own tents praying that our tents would hold up.  Thankfully our tents survived the rain storm; a nice bonus was the weather cooled down to the 60s making a pleasantly cool morning the next day.

The morning after the rain storm

Morning after the rain storm

Take the time to choose your shelter properly, as you never know what type of weather you will encounter.   Because we do not use them for cold winters, we have 3-season backpacking tents, and they have worked well for us.  Your choice of shelter will depend on your climate and the areas you will most likely be visiting.

Lighting

We had camping lanterns, flashlights and head lamps.  Next time, I will bring the Luci solar lantern that I recently tested; it would have been a lot more lightweight.

Food preparation

Due to the recent drought, campfires were not allowed in the area.  We used our camp stoves to prepare food.

The food tasted really good because because we were outdoors and we very hungry.   Some of our favorite lightweight foods are Mountain House Chicken and Noodles for dinners, and Mountain House Scrambled Eggs and Bacon for breakfast.  We also brought plenty of food bars for in between meal snacks, as well as the old standby, PB & J sandwiches.

As night approached, it was my chance to test how to tell how much daylight is left when out in the wilderness.  I posted about it here and found the method was surprisingly accurate.

Hygiene

Not having much water was hard on the hygiene front.  I brought baby wipes which helped a lot.  On the plus side, the location did have a composting toilet at a short distance away, requiring a bit of walking.  I was surprised the composting toilet did not smell at all, unlike porta potties or outhouses.  I was so impressed at the condition of the composting toilet that I have started researching DIY info such as this one.

When water is scarce, having backup ways to wash up is important-I will need to stock up on wipes.

Entertainment

The kids initially were worried about not having their computers and Kindle but they adapted very quickly.  The kids learned were taught how to use a sling shot properly -soon they were targeting shooting cacti.  They also found other ways to entertain themselves outdoors such as collecting rocks and snail shells.  We also brought card and board games – the kids played a mean game of UNO and it was a lot of fun.

We also found a nearby river and spent a nice day wading in the cool water.  The kids enjoyed pitching rocks, playing in the water and trying to catch fish.

Another unexpected delight was watching fireflies flitting around outside the tents.  Being city folks, we rarely see fireflies and found them really fascinating.

After the 48 hours were up, we returned to “normal life,”  tired but glad to know it is possible, even enjoyable in some ways.  We were really appreciative of running water and hot showers when we returned.  I thought I would miss the electronics a lot more than I actually did.  Next time we will try being unplugged longer.

© Apartment Prepper 2014

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

 

Show young kids that being prepared can be fun!

Jake and Miller's Big Adventure

 

 

 

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Cox’s Honey Holiday Giveaway

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Merry Christmas Cox’s Honey Giveaway

Merry Christmas Cox's Honey Giveaway Oct. 27th-Nov. 2nd, 2014 by FoodStorageMoms.com
I know we are just barely getting to Halloween but the holidays are right around the corner! Cox’s Honey is involved in a another giveaway! This giveaway is a little different. We will have one winner chosen through our Rafflecopter system. Then that winner will give the names and addresses to Cox’s Honey for FIVE of their friends to receive the same giftpack shown above! WooHoo! This is a sponsored group giveaway and we thank Cox’s Honey for these awesome prizes. Have you tried their creamed honey….fabulous! Have you seen: Cox’s Honey Website?
This Cox’s Honey Gift Pack Giveaway is open to any resident who is 18 years of age or older who lives in one of the 48 US Contiguous States. This giveaway starts on Monday, Oct. 27th at 5:00 am (MDT) and ends on Sunday, Nov.2nd, 2014 at 5:00 pm (MDT). The winner will be notified by email and will have 24 hours to respond. If we do not hear back from said winner in the designated time period of 24 hours we will choose another winner and they will have 24 hours to respond from the time the notification email is sent. Please check your SPAM email folders. Good luck to everyone! Let’s be prepared for the unexpected!
a Rafflecopter giveaway



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What if Your Apartment has Ebola?

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What if Your Apartment has Ebola

There are still a lot of worries about the Ebola virus right now, with the latest one being the doctor in NYC who tested positive for the virus after having returned from treating patients in Guinea. Before being diagnosed, he visited a coffee stand, a restaurant, took three subway lines, ran in a park and went to a bowling alley. Officials are saying these places have been cleared and are safe.

It was mentioned in the news his apartment units had to be locked down. Similarly, the other patients in Dallas also lived in apartments and their units were disinfected by teams in hazmat suits. I can only imagine what the neighbors must have felt as they witnessed the heavily suited teams, or getting a phone call such as the one described in “Hello. Your Neighbor Has Ebola.” The neighbors received flyers providing information about Ebola and risks of contracting it. Assurances were given that their neighborhoods are safe.

I am seeing a lot of nervous comments on social media, and see a lot of people searching for what to do if about Ebola comes to their towns. Since I write about apartment prepper issues, I would be remiss if I didn’t at least discuss the possibility.

What if your apartment has an Ebola victim?

First of all you need to be observant and aware of what’s going on in your immediate vicinity. If an area is cordoned off, don’t jump to conclusions that it’s Ebola. It could be just a normal activity such as a spill or repairs being done. However, if you see hazmat suited individuals, you will know something is going on. Read information left on your doorstep – a lot of people throw them away without even reading.

We’ve all heard the way to contract the disease is through contact with bodily fluids, and how the virus is not airborne. I am not telling anyone to panic – that would be counterproductive. But if you just have a twinge of concern that what you are touching may have germs, then keep reading.

Common areas

Be careful what you touch in all common areas such as the gym, business office, club rooms, vending machine room, coffee room.

  • If you must visit these areas, avoid coming into contact with surfaces where germs may live. If you are extra worried, wear disposable gloves when touching any surfaces such as doorknobs, elevator buttons, light switches, gym equipment etc. If you find yourself without gloves, use a thick paper towel or several paper towels when flushing the toilet, turning on faucets, lights or opening doors.
  • Do not touch your eyes, face, mouth or nose with you gloved hands, or even with your own hands unless you have thoroughly washed or disinfected your hands.
    · When removing disposable gloves remove them without your skin coming into contact with the outside of the gloves.
  • After removing the gloves, wash your hands with soap and water as soon as possible.

These are reasonable steps that don’t go overboard – at the very least you will also protect yourself from germs such as the common cold, flu etc.

Can you catch Ebola from using the swimming pool?

Chlorine bleach is used to sanitize surfaces in hospitals, and chlorine is present in pools. According to a pool website, as long as your pool has chlorine bromine levels in the 1.5ppm-3ppm level there would be no way to ever catch Ebola from being in a pool. Of course your pool would need to be well-maintained at the proper levels to be certain it is within this guideline.

However, viruses can live for a long time on hard surfaces such as pool chairs, shower handles etc. According to the CDC website, “Ebola dried on surfaces such as doorknobs and counter tops can survive for several hours; however, virus in body fluids (such as blood) can survive up to several days at room temperature.”

I would suggest avoid sitting down on the pool deck, patio chairs and using outside barbecue facilities until you know everything has been disinfected. You should bring your own folding chair if you wanted to sit by the pool.

And I can’t stress it enough: Always wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water and use disinfecting solutions.

What if someone vomits outside?

The most simple thing to do is avoid the area of the vomit. Do not let your kids play near there, and do not walk your dog in that area. Vomit from an Ebola patient is highly contagious and contact with any fluids must be avoided. If someone else stepped on it, they would track the germs with them.

A good way to avoid bringing germs inside is to take your shoes off before entering your home. Wear sandals or flip flops that are strictly for inside your home. When I lived in Hawaii many years ago, I noticed that most households practiced leaving shoes out in the porch. I thought it is a good way to keep your home clean.

What about the dumpster?

Every apartment has a dumpster area where all the tenants throw out their trash.
If using the dumpster, wear disposable gloves and don’t forget to throw out the gloves after one use. Do not reuse these gloves or and remember not to touch anything else especially your own face, nose, eyes, mouth or skin.

Disinfecting

Here is a good article regarding disinfection with bleach:
Ebola Virus Disinfection with Bleach

Don’t panic

At this point in time, both of the nurses from Dallas have recovered. The lab worker who self-quarantined in the cruise ship turned out to be negative for the virus. So there have been some good news. There is one patient in NYC, and we are keeping our fingers crossed no one else gets infected. As I mentioned in What would do if Ebola were to spread in your city you will need to decide for yourself and your family at what point you would go on lockdown or leave for a few days.

Read this good article on Ebola from The Survival Doctor:
Sensation-Free Ebola Facts: What We Know and What We Don’t

This book also gives some straightforward information: Ebola: Understanding and Preparing for an Outbreak by Alex Smith

Stay informed about any developments and be discerning about whom to believe. We pray this passes soon and no other new cases pop up.

© Apartment Prepper 2014

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Book Feature: Liberators and Interview with James Wesley Rawles

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Liberators

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Today we are featuring James Wesley Rawles’s latest book, Liberators.  As you know Mr. Rawles is the author of several books, and is the founder of SurvivalBlog, one of the first survival and emergency websites.

What is Liberators about?

America has experienced a socio-economic collapse that spreads throughout the world.  Looting and rioting affect all major cities.  The book follows Afghanistan War vet Ray McGregor as he makes his way from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to his parents’ ranch in Bella Coola, British Columbia, in remote western Canada. His old friend Phil Adams, a Defense Intelligence Agency counterintelligence case officer joins him in his journey.

Lightly populated Bella Coola, the home of Ray’s parents is not devastated by the chaos but is taken over by a foreign occupation.  Ray and Phil become key members of the resistance in a war that will have far reaching effects.

From Amazon:  Liberators depicts a world that is all too conceivable and terrifyingly familiar. Fastpaced and packed with authentic information on outdoor survival, self-sufficiency, and small-unit tactics, James Wesley, Rawles’s latest thriller will resonate with his dedicated fanbase and encourage new readers to prepare for anything from lesser disasters to the dreaded worst-case scenario.

 Interview with James Wesley Rawles

1. Do you feel the UN has designs on the U.S. in terms of taking control?

Yes, the globalist camp that rules the UN clearly has domination of the US in their long-term-plans. They simply cannot allow a bastion of liberty to survive if they have any hope of instituting global; government.

2. In your book there was a fictional invasion of Western Canada by China. China has been flexing its muscles of late – do you think China would end up owning us, or invading us?

That threat was accelerated in the novel for the sake of drama. Presently, since they lack blue water navy and the requisite transport, the PLA cannot project force across the Pacific. But in another 15 or 20 years, that threat could indeed be manifested.

3. In the story, one of the pseudo governments took over Fort Knox. In our current economy – gold has been dropping in price, “financial experts” say it’s not coming back up anytime soon, however the affluent are buying up large amounts. What is your take on gold right now?

I believe that gold and silver are both undervalued. My preference is for silver. At less than $18 per Troy ounce it is presently a bargain. Buy it cheap and stack it deep!

4. The oil boom in Wyoming, North Dakota etc. has attracted a lot of newcomers to these areas – has your opinion changed on which states are still good for bugging out or establishing a homestead?

My advice is essentially unchanged. The Bakken oil shale development simply represents further diversification of the economy for Montana. However, I would avoid living in the immediate vicinity, because of the many “camp follower” vices that are inevitable in boom towns.

5. The ebola virus is a concern for many, and at lot of advice point to the possibility of having to hunker down in your home and stay in isolation. However this may be difficult for apartment dwellers living in the city. What would be the best approach for apartment dwellers?

I would say extremely difficult, because of sanitation issues that would be created by backed-up toilets (in the event of a power grid collapse and subsequent failure of civic water supplies), or simply hazard one or more bodies in your apartment building that are not removed promptly-or removed without full attention to contaminating body fluids.

6. Most of my readers are city dwellers who are not able to relocate to a small town or rural area due to their circumstances – what are some options if they had to bug out?

Because you may only have ONE trip out of Dodge, you need to pre-position the vast majority of your food and gear at your intended bug out location. Without those supplies, you will just be another hungry person to feed, for the locals. Be part of the solution—not part of the problem.

7. I understand your next book will be a non fiction book. Can you give us an idea what it will be and when is the expected publishing date?

It is titled Tools for Survival. It is a comprehensive book that covers everything from guns to sewing machines. That book will be released by Penguin in December.

Our thanks to James Wesley Rawles for the interview.  Liberators has just been released and is now available in Amazon and other bookstores.  Like his other books, you’ll get involved in the story, and learn some survival techniques at the same time.

 

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

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