May 13, 2020

How to Limit Your Exposure to Colds, Flu and Coronavirus

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

A lot of people are concerned about minimizing their risks of catching germs from colds, flus and possibly the Wuhan coronavirus. As someone who recently had a severe cough and cold for several weeks, I certainly want to avoid any further sickness.

Advice to the public from WHO

According the WHO (World Health Organization) the advice being given to the public regarding the Wuhan coronavirus is similar to cold and flu season advice:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water frequently. If you are unable to wash your hands, use an alcohol-based hand cleaner.
  • Use tissues to cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough. Or if you don’t have tissues, use your elbows. This is primarily to stop the spread of germs to others. If you use your hand to cover your mouth or nose, you contaminate your hands and other surfaces that you touch.
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, mouth or face.
  • Distance yourself from anyone with a cough, cold or fever by staying at least three feet away from them.
  • Avoid eating raw or undercooked animal products.
  • If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, see a medical professional for treatment right away. Let them know if you have been to areas in China affected by the new coronavirus. If you have not visited China, stay home and get plenty of rest so you can recover.

(Notice: We do not give medical advice.  We may write about general health topics with regard to emergency preparedness but this is not medical advice.  Please contact your medical professional if you have symptoms.)

Avoid crowds

The only way to avoid getting exposed to sick people is by avoiding crowds.

This means you limit going out to activities like the movies, concerts, airports and shopping malls.

Shopping

Shop online as much as possible. When your packages arrive, you will still need to handle them, but sanitize your hands as soon as possible.

  • For grocery shopping, I have used Instacart. (I don’t have any affiliation with them but I have used their services in the past and had good results.)
  • I order pet supplies through Chewy.com
  • Order vitamins from eVitamins or Amazon.
  • Order over the counter medicines from Walgreens.com
  • I never like to run out of my favorite coffees or teas, so I order them from Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf.

Entertainment

To avoid going out we watch movies and shows through Netflix, Hulu or Amazon Prime, and watch YouTube videos. We also have free to air channels. Although I love the library, I have been reading books through Kindle .  You do not need to own a Kindle, you just download the Kindle app on your phone or computer and you can read any Kindle book.

Limiting exposure is NOT the same as quarantine

Hopefully this article has given you ideas on limiting your exposure. This is not the same as isolation or quarantine. Isolation or quarantine means you stay home and no one goes in or out of your house for a period of time.

Image by silviarita from Pixabay

Image by congerdesign from Pixabay

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2 Comments on How to Limit Your Exposure to Colds, Flu and Coronavirus

  1. Good article, Bernie. They say that, based on SARS and MERS experience, coronaviruses can persist on surfaces and remain infectious (at room temperature) up to 9 days. And that LOW temperature and high humidity will INCREASE the “lifespan” of the virus.

    Source: https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-02/rb-hlc020720.php

    That got me thinking about the most important surfaces we must disinfect. I came up with doorknobs, tabletops, computer keyboards, car steering wheels, cell phones, light switches, toilet handles, TV remotes, musical instruments, and children’s toys. What did I miss?

    • Hi Ron, Good point, that is a long time for viruses to live on a surface. You’ve included a good list of what should be disinfected frequently; I would add the car door handle, car and house keys since we touch them daily, purses (especially the underside) for the ladies and toothbrush/toothbrush holder (if you’ve been sick). Thanks for the comment!

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