Cox’s Honey Group Giveaway

Coxs Honey Group Giveaway, raw, unfiltered, pure honey |via www.foodstoragemoms.com
Today we are hosting another Cox’s Honey Group Giveaway so our readers will have a chance to win some raw, unfiltered, pure honey. Cox’s Honey is sponsoring this giveaway today and we want to thank them for giving us this opportunity. Cox’s Honey is raw and unfiltered honey.

A bit of history…

The company was started back in 1880 in Orderville, Utah by Delaun Mills Cox. Mr. Cox produced enough sweet honey for the entire city before moving the operations to Shelley, Idaho. Delaun kept his beehives going more like a hobby. But after World War I he began making more money as a hobbyist than his previous holdings.

During the following years honey prices became depressed and in 1925 his son, Orville S. Cox took over his bee business. Orville made the bee business his tool of trade for his livelihood and raising his family. He produced, packaged and sold clover honey.

Details about Cox’s Honey Giveaway:

This Cox’s Honey Giveaway is open to any resident who is 18 years of age or older who lives in one of the 48 US Contiguous States. This giveaway starts on Wednesday, Oct. 1st at 5:00 am (MDT) and ends on Monday, Oct. 6th at 5:00 pm (MDT). The winner will be notified by email and will have 24 hours to respond. If we do not hear back from said winner in the designated time period of 24 hours we will choose another winner and they will have 24 hours to respond from the time the notification email is sent. Please check your SPAM email folders. Good luck to everyone! Let’s be prepared for the unexpected!
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Monday Musings: 9/29/2014

Monday Musings 09272014

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com
Welcome to another Monday Musings, where we share interesting links about all things preparedness, as well as updates on the blog.

First the blog updates…

I haven’t had as much time to work on Apartment Prepper this past week due to a tight work schedule.  I hope this week will be much better.

Fall is here and I am so glad the weather is starting to cool off (not a let yet, but I am grateful)  I have some interesting projects coming up, one of them is how to make a heat retention cooker aka, a wonder oven, thanks to instructions from fellow blogger Megan who runs the My Food Storage Cookbook site.  As always, I will let you know how it turns out.

Now for the links…

One Awesome Article site launch

Todd of Prepper Website has a neat new site: www.oneawesomearticle.com. The idea is that guys will receive one AWESOME article in their inbox a day.  It is geared towards guys, but you ladies will want your guys to get this to make them a better…..guy.  The article will include a link to an awesome article on the web, special offers, book suggestions or cool products.  This great info will only come through the daily email, so make sure you sign up.  This is not a paid endorsement.  I just know that after visiting  Prepper Website for several years now, I can always count on Todd to point me to some great leads on the web.

oneawesomearticle.com

 

New NatGeo show

The new show is called Live Free or Die.  While not prepper focused, the series focuses on self-reliance and homesteading which is always of interest.

Ep105_006_LiveFreeOrDie

Live Free or Die photo, Courtesy of National Geographic, with permission

 

Live Free or Die examines one of America’s most remote subcultures, following five individuals living in the country’s backwoods and swamps with few of the trappings of modern society. Freed from the constraints of a technology-fueled existence, they are modern-day pioneers who rely only on skill and intuition to harness the natural environment. Here is a clip, courtesy of National Geographic.

Live Free or Die: Road Kill: It’s What’s For Dinner!

North Carolina homesteaders, Tony and Amelia, cook road kill given to them by Amelia’s Dad.

Link: http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/live-free-or-die/videos/road-kill-its-whats-for-dinner/

Embed:

More links…

Chlorine Bleach For Sanitizing Raw Fruits And Vegetables

I’m Going To ???

An Open Letter to My Past Female Students Entering College

A Prepared Cook’s Guide To Creating An Ideal Kitchen Space

From Dehydrated to Dinner

17 Clever Food Storage Tricks

Castile Soap – Make Chemical Free Products for Your Family

Getting a Child and Yourself Ready for College

 

Take care and have a great week everyone!

 

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

National Preparedness Month: Put Your Preps to the Test with 24 Hours Unplugged

 National Preparedness Month Put Your Preps to the TestWritten by Daisy Luther

This article first appear in The Organic Prepper

It’s National Preparedness Month, and the Professional Prepared Bloggers Association is celebrating by providing you with tons of information from some of the best writers in the niche in our 30 Days of Preparedness round-up!

It’s Day 28!!!! It’s time to take your game up a notch with 24 hours unplugged! No fair doing this on a day when you will be away from your normal activities anyway – you want to put your preps to the test!

A grid down scenario doesn’t have to be a massive EMP that detonates over the middle of the country, throwing us back to the 1800s.  It can be as simple (and likely) as a winter storm, a hurricane, or a computer issue at your local power station. While this is a fairly common occurrence, many people still seem taken completely by surprise when it happens. Without back-up heat, cooking methods, and lighting, the unprepared family could be in for a very unpleasant time until the lights come back on. Every family should be prepared for a minimum of two weeks without power.  Nearly 2000 families were still without power 94 days after Superstorm Sandy hit the East Coast.

Here’s why you should test your preps.

A couple of years ago, my youngest daughter and I spent a year in the North Woods of Ontario.  It was a grand adventure, totally different from the city life we’d had previous to this.  Our small cabin was on the banks of a beautiful lake and the edge of hundreds of acres of forest wilderness.  It was heated only by wood, and although we had electricity, we were warned that it was sporadic, since we were fairly remote and regular maintenance was not always performed on the lines of the area.

As a prepared family we were pretty sure we’d be just fine when the power went out.

The first time it happened was on a mild early autumn morning. The power went out for no apparent reason, and we high-fived each other. Game on!

Since it was afternoon and the weather was nice, it really wasn’t much of a challenge. The power returned before daylight, we had some stuff in the fridge for sandwiches, and we basically just needed to entertain ourselves sans grid. No big deal – we are bookworms, so we spent the day curled up with some good reads.  We did make one unexpected discovery – our well was pumped by an electric component, so when the power went out, we also had no running water, including water to flush with.  Of course, we had stored drinking water, and we brought a couple of buckets of water up from the lake for flushing, so this was a minor inconvenience.

However, it did get me thinking about how we would flush if the weather was cold enough that the lake was frozen, but there wasn’t snow on the ground.  Hmmm…#1 Note to Self – store water for flushing too!

The next power outage occurred a couple of weeks later and it was a much bigger deal. The initial outage hit at about 7 o’clock on a chilly fall evening. It was dark and cold. We stoked up a fire in the woodstove, and began to search for our lighting solutions. Unfortunately, I hadn’t had the forethought to set up off-grid lighting in each room, so after digging for my candles in the dark closet, I had to carry one around to light candles in subsequent rooms.

#2 Note to Self: Keep candles, holders, and lighters in each room in a place which is easy to access in the dark.  After this, we placed candles in holders are part of the decor all around the house.

The wind roared around outside the cabin and our power did not return for 3 days.  We used the woodstove to heat up meals, but we couldn’t find all of the bits and pieces for a game we wanted to play. #3 Note to Self: Keep off-grid entertainment well-organized, especially if there are children in the house.

On the second day of the outage, we dragged our chest freezer out onto the deck to keep our food from going bad in the cozy cabin. #4 Note to Self:  Get something sturdy to store food in outdoorsthat won’t draw wild animals to your porch that also doesn’t require you to drag a 200+ pound appliance outside.

By the time the next power outage rolled around, we had learned many lessons. At the first sign of windy weather, we immediately filled the bathtub. A bucket right beside the tub served as a container to transfer water from the tub to the toilet so that we could flush. A sturdy Rubbermaid storage bench with a lock resided on our deck, waiting to be pressed into duty as an outdoor freezer.  Each room boasted of decorative candles.  Home canned meals in jars lined my kitchen shelves, and a beautiful cast iron Dutch oven sat at the ready to simmer a delicious stew or pot of beans on the woodstove. A couple of pretty baskets were filled with art supplies and games (with all of their pieces) and a couple of kerosene lamps that were bright enough for reading sat at either end of the sofa.  Since the fans that blew the heat into the bedrooms obviously did not work without power, we had a couple of air mattresses to set up in the living room on the coldest nights, so we could stay cozy by the fire.

The next time the power went out, we were excited because it meant a break in our day-to-day routine of work and school.  Power outages had become mini-vacations, and were no longer even a blip on the radar for us.

We don’t live in our little cabin in the woods any more, but the lessons we learned allow us to take power outages in stride in a way that most people don’t. Even though we don’t expect a shaky grid where we live now, our home is organized in the way that we learned up North. Lighting, extra water, sanitation, cold food solutions, and off-grid cooking tools are all close at hand should they be needed.

Are you ready to test your preps?

Your challenge, should you choose to accept it, is to go for 24 hours without the grid. This means no electrical power, no central climate control, and no running water!  Some people will go hardcore and turn of the main water valve and flip all of the breakers. Others will just opt not to use those items.

 

  1. During your 24 hours off-grid, you’ll eat three meals, go to the bathroom, keep your family clean and at a comfortable temperature, and entertain yourselves. This a tall order in some locations!
  2. Plan ahead of time how you’ll overcome the challenges – you can learn a lot this way.
  3. But the real learning experience will come from the challenges you didn’t expect and plan for. This is how you will fill the holes that exist in your preps. It is far better to discover those gaps now, when back-up is as close as the breaker box in your basement, than it is to discover it when disaster strikes.
  4. Give every family member a notebook so they can jot down what works and what doesn’t.  Once your Grid-Down drill is over, compare notes.  You may be surprised at the observations your children have made.
  5. Make a shopping list based on the notes and fill those gaps!

 Testing…1,2,3…

Have you tried an off-grid drill before? What did you learn? If not, what’s stopping you? Share in the comments below.

Supplemental Reading:

One Second After

Alas, Babylon

The Prepper’s Blueprint: The Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Through Any Disaster

 

About the Author:
Daisy Luther is a freelance writer and editor.  Her website, The Organic Prepper, offers information on healthy prepping, including premium nutritional choices, general wellness and non-tech solutions. You can follow Daisy on Facebook and Twitter, and you can email her at daisy@theorganicprepper.ca

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

What would You Do if Ebola Were to Spread in Your City?

What would you do if ebola were to spread in your city

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is still very much in the news.  Most news articles keep stressing that it is unlikely to reach the U.S. and downplay any threats.  On the other hand, the CDC has released guidelines for hospitals should an infected person were to present himself.  New projections estimate that 500,000 may be infected by the end of January.  (Note:  Since the article was written, the estimates have now been revised to 1.4 million)

Earlier this week, Urban Survival had a good discussion about it:  When Will Ebola Infect the Markets?  Mr. Ure brought up a good point that if people got desperate enough, they would say anything or do anything to get out of their area and fly somewhere.  The problem would be if they were already infected and didn’t know it, then get on a plane, potentially exposing hundreds of people.

How people can get exposed in a hospital

Consider for a moment what could happen when a person who appears to have flu-like symptoms but has Ebola were to go the emergency room.

  1. The person signs in and sits down before getting called.  If they appear to be in urgent need, they may get seen quicker than others, but either way, they sit in a waiting room with people on either side, in front and behind them.  These people could potentially be exposed.  I should state that all reports say they virus is not airborne, yet a few healthcare workers who have suits on still seem to catch it somehow.  Let’s say just four people are exposed, being on the conservative side.  There would be more if the hospital is in a busy urban area.
  2. The patient then gets called to speak to a billing person who interviews him or her regarding insurance and payment.  That person could now be exposed.
  3. Finally, the patient is sent inside the emergency department.  While waiting for the doctor, a nurse or assistant takes their blood pressure, temperature, questions them about symptoms, etc.  None of these personnel were protective clothing.  Now we have seen five people exposed, from the minute the patient came in.
  4. Finally, the person is seen by a doctor, who then orders that the patient be admitted.  The doctor is now the 6th person who came in contact with the infected patient.

If the patient is not immediately identified as contagious, more workers will be taking x-rays, wheeling the patient around in elevators, etc.  By now, there could be at least 10 people exposed.

At a recent doctor’s appointment, I asked the doctor if he was at all concerned about the spread of Ebola in the U.S.  This was around the time the first patient was sent to Emory University Hospital.  My doctor indicated was not too worried, since he was very familiar with Emory and they have the best infection control policies and equipment.  However he said, “unless some grievous error were to happen,” in other words, a medical mistake, which can happen if there were more infected patients.  I’ve worked in hospitals in the past, and accidents do happen.  Even the most careful, rigorous protocols occasionally fail.  I don’t want anyone to panic by any means, but to consider the possibility and make a plan just in case.

A few things to think about:

  • Are you at risk for infection if the virus spread to your town or city?  Densely populated areas tend to have people living closer together, thus increasing the risk of exposure.  If you live in an apartment building that has common areas such as coffee rooms, reception areas, swimming pool, management office and elevators, you may need to away from these areas should there be a pandemic.
  • At what point would you keep everyone at home?  When would you skip work, have your partner stay home, and keep kids from school?
  • Would you stay in your apartment or home, or leave and go to a safer, less populated location?  Many city dwellers do not have a bug-out location, but do have family or friends outside of town who may be in a less crowded area.  Now is the time to think about this, before anything happens.
  • Are you prepared for a lockdown?  You’ll need enough food and supplies for a couple of weeks without having to shopping.  You won’t want to run out of toilet paper, prescriptions and other essentials if you are trying to avoid crowds and exposure.
  • If someone at home were to get sick, do you have supplies to get you through?  You would need sick room supplies such as protective clothing (gloves, protective goggles) lots of disinfectant such as bleach, antibacterial wipes, basic first aid supplies, etc.

I don’t have all the answers, but I hope this exercise gets you thinking and getting a few supplies just in case.  If nothing happens, then we can all be relieved and grateful.  Just like with any other disaster, if the dreaded event happens, it’s best to be prepared.  See What to Do If you are Worried about Ebola

When the CDC Tells Us to Prepare for the Ebola Pandemic, Things Are About to Get Real

Get updates from the CDC website

Apartment Prepper readers know I am not given to fear-mongering and I try to take a common sense approach to preparing for disasters.  I pray the troops who are sent to help with the outbreak stay safe and  hope that current measures are enough to contain the ebola outbreak and it will burn out soon.

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

 

 Ebola Survival Handbook now available

Ebola Survival Handbook

National Preparedness Month Mega Giveaway!

sep giveaway

In honor of this month being Preparedness Month, The Prepared Bloggers are proud to present a Mega giveaway.

We are proud to partner with 6 great companies for seven great prizes. These prizes are the perfect way to either begin your preparedness journey or add to your preps. We will have seven winners in this giveaway. Each winner will win one of the following prizes listed below. The giveaway starts September 22nd, 2014 @12:15 am (CST) and ends September 29th, 2014 @ 11:55 pm (CST). This giveaway is open to anyone 18 years of age and older who is a US resident of the 48 Continental US States only. Each winner will be sent an email and the winner must respond within 24 hours or another winner will be chosen.

Berkey

1 Royal Berkey System–From LPC Survival–This system is perfect for 2-6 people, filtering 3.25 gallons in about 2 hours. It comes with  2 Black Elements and is perfect for large families but is small enough for travel.

sun-oven

1 Sun Oven–From Sun Oven–This is a great off-grid cooking solution using only solar energy. This Sun Oven includes a cookbook, dehydrating and baking rack set, two easy stack pots, a WAPI, and two loaf pans.

new-kelly-kettle

1 Scout Kelly Kettle–From Kelly Kettle–The Kelly Kettle boils water quick and with very little fuel. It’s great for camping trips, hunting trips and emergencies.

grainmill

1 Wonder Junior Deluxe–From Wonder Mill–This is the perfect solution for making your own bread off-grid. It’s one of the easiest to use hand mills on the market. A great mill to use in an emergency situation, an off-grid environment or for everyday use.

propur

1 Propur Big with 2 ProOne 7″ G2.0 Filters–From End Times Warehouse–A clean water supply is super important in every situation. This gravity fed water treatment system makes it super easy to always have clean water.

72-hour-kit

2 Seventy Two Hour Kits–From Survival Based–Be prepared for a sudden storm or power outage with this all in one 72 hour kit. Complete with fuel to cook the food contained in the kit. Keep this kit in your car, house, or grab it if you need to evacuate.  Two lucky people will each win one 72 hour kit.

 

Cox-Honey-two

1 Case of Six 5lb Creamed Honey (30lb total)–From Cox’s Honey–Honey is the prefect item to place in you food storage. It’s also great for a number of other uses. Cox honey is raw and unfiltered making it some of the best honey on the market.

Thanks again to all of our sponsors.

Enter below

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sep giveaway two

10 Disaster Preparedness Tips for Couples

10 disaster preparedness tips for couplesAlthough we have a lot of discussions about family preparedness, we also have many Apartment Prepper readers who are couples with no kids.  Here are 10 easy ideas to prepare for disasters when you are a couple.

1.  Make a joint decision to prepare.  If you are in a relationship, there is a chance that your partner is not on board with preparing, which may make it difficult for you.  I know a few of those personally – are some tips if your spouse feels that prepping means your are being paranoid

However, the un-supportive partner may feel differently if you show practical reasons such as preparing for a hurricane or you are concerned about job loss.  You’ll also want to decide where to store your supplies ahead of time.

If you have to, you may have to use your own funds instead of the joint funds for the preparedness budget.   Now that we’ve gotten this out of the way, we can get started.

2.   Get your water supply started.  Buy two 5-gallon containers or bottled water – these are carried at grocery stores, discount and home stores.  Now you have 10 gallons of water for the two of you, enough for five days.  The following week, pick up another two 5-gallon containers, and you will be covered for 10 days.

By the third week, find a good water filtration system such as the Berkey, or Katadyn so you can filter water from other sources in an emergency.

3.  Start buying shelf stable foods that both of you like to eat.  Initially, pick up canned foods, instant noodles, cereal, crackers, peanut butter etc.  The key is buying only foods that you both like.  Start with a week’s worth, then build up to a month.

The following week, purchase a backup cooking method such as a propane stove, rocket stove.

4.  First Aid:  If you don’t already have one, buy a prepackaged starter first aid kit – Costco and Sam’s have a good sized one for $20 or so.  Add a month or two supply of your personal  prescriptions such as birth control pills, blood pressure meds, asthma inhalers, allergy medicines etc.  Pack extra pairs of eyeglasses and/or contact lenses.

5.  For hygiene supplies, stock up on toilet paper, soap, shampoo, toothpaste, toiletries, large trash bags, paper plates and cups.  Buy enough for two people to last two weeks then build up to a month.

6.  For communication, have a backup list of contacts for both you and your spouse.  Make sure your phones are always charged.  For news when the power is out, have a battery operated or crank radio.  It is also good to have a solar charger for small electronics.

Backup your important documents.   Build a grab and go binder as soon as possible.

Make an emergency plan on how your would contact each other in the event of an emergency.  There is always a chance an emergency will happen in the middle of the day when you are both at work.  Plan alternate routes home from your work sites in case of a traffic standstill.

7.  For lighting, pick up flashlights and batteries, extra matches, tap lights and/or a camp lantern.  Emergency lighting can be found inexpensively, if you prepared ahead of time

8.  Hide cash for emergencies in a spot that both of you know about.  You never know when a bank glitch may keep you from accessing your accounts.

9.  Don’t forget about pets.  Build a pet emergency kit – set aside extra water, food and any pet supplies.

10.  Discuss the idea of safety and defense with your partner.   Unless you discuss it beforehand, there may be disagreements – Explore various options such as stun guns, tasers, pepper spray and firearms.

These are just ideas to get started with disaster preparedness- you can do them in any order, then build from there.

 

For more fast and easy tips to become more prepared, read my book:

Get the real deal. Whether bugging out or sheltering in place, you can never have enough clean water for survival: For your water purifier needs, please visit:

 

An inexpensive but helpful tool to keep track of supplies (Iphone or Ipad users)

How to Protect Your Family from Enterovirus D68

How to Protect your Family from Enterovirus D68This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

We’re now hearing that more states have been reporting cases of the Enterovirus D68, the virus that has been sending many children to the hospital due to complications.  This article discusses symptoms to watch and how you can protect your family.

What is Enterovirus D68?

The symptoms caused by the virus start out similar to cold:  sore throat, runny nose, sneezing, coughing.  Many cases turn out fine, and the sufferer recovers on his or her own.  However, a percentage of cases develop complications, such as trouble breathing.  According to the CDC, the virus had not been very common in the past.  IN recent weeks, many states such as Missouri, Illinois, Utah, Oklahoma, Michigan, Georgia, Ohio, etc. have been reporting that hospitals’ emergency rooms are full of patients with respiratory problems.  The virus especially affects babies, children, and teenagers.  Children with asthma are most at risk.

Treatment

Just like the common cold, there is no specific way to treat patients afflicted by Enterovirus D68; you can only relieve the symptoms by taking over the counter remedies such as Tylenol (acetaminophen), Motrin or Advil (ibuprophen).  If symptoms worsen and the person has trouble breathing, see a doctor as soon as possible or go to the nearest emergency room.

Prevention

Prevention is the best way to protect yourself and your family.   (Note:  I am not a medical professional – these are steps I personally take to keep from getting sick.  If you are unsure and need personalized advice, see a doctor or medical practitioner.)

Avoid crowds   Being among lots of people increases your chances of getting contaminated.

Frequent handwashing  Get everyone in the family in the habit of washing their hands as they come home from public places and before eating.  If you cannot wash your hands right away, use antibacterial wipes.

Stop touching your eyes and face  It is very hard to keep kids from touching their faces, but you have to try to teach them this lesson.

Disinfect surfaces around you  Keep a box of antibacterial wipes and clean door knobs, light switches and other commonly touched items around you.  Keep a canister of Lysol wipes at the office and disinfect your desk, keyboard and phone on a regular basis.

Stay home if you are sick  Avoid going to work or sending the kids to school if you notice any symptoms.  Staying home and getting plenty of rest will not only help with recovery but also prevent spreading germs.

Bolster your Immune System

  • Get enough sleep and rest.
  • Relax and avoid stress.
  • Exercise at least three to four days a week.
  • Eat a healthy diet.  Avoid eating processed foods too frequently.  Include fresh vegetables and fruits in your menus.  Take vitamin supplements if you feel you don’t eat well enough.

What to stock up

You hope no one in your household catches anything but keeping a few items in your emergency kit will help you avoid having to go to the store if someone does get sick:

  • Over the counter pain relievers such as Tylenol, Advil, Nyquil as well children’s versions of these remedies
  • Thermometer
  •  Extra boxes of tissues
  •  Cough drops
  •  Decongestant
  •  Canned juices
  • Apple cider vinegar – This home remedy has helped me prevent several colds since I first tried it.
  •  Canned chicken soup – I know home made is best, but sometimes you just feel too sick to make anything and canned chicken noodle soup will do in a pinch.
  • Eucalyptus essential oil - Eucalyptus oil relieves congestion in a pleasant way.  Just add a few drops to a warm,moist wash cloth and breath in.  In an upcoming article, I will discuss some really effective essential oils that can be added to your home’s emergency kit.

 

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 


Spark Naturals Essential Oils
Back 2 School Kit

Monday Musings 9/15/2014: Preparedness Updates and Links

Monday Musings 09152014 Preparedness Updates and Links

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Welcome to another Monday Musings, where we share interesting links about preparedness, as well as updates on the blog.

First the blog updates…

So many books… so little time…

Preppers History and the Cultural Phenomenon

We added another book to our reading list:  Preppers:  History and the Cultural Phenomenon by Lynda King.

More on Expiration Dates

One of the most controversial topics in preparedness involves expiration dates – invariably there are disagreements about this, even among bloggers.  Reader Pierce sent me this helpful guide on shelf life on food bank products.  It has some really applicable information.  Thanks Pierce!  See Shelf Life of Food Bank Products

National Preparedness Month Series

Don’t miss a great series in Prepared Bloggers for National Preparedness Month – there is something new everyday!

Mega Giveaway Next Week!

Next Monday, we will be announcing a huge giveaway, so please check back!

Now for the links…

America’s Poor, Deeper in Debt Than Ever

Obama: U.S. military to provide equipment, resources to battle Ebola epidemic in Africa

What We’re Afraid to Say About Ebola

Guide to Long Term Food Storage

Natural Asthma Treatment with Essential Oils

Elderberry Extract: Nature’s “Tamiflu”

Your Emergency Fund Is For More Than Emergencies – Believe It!

Take care and have a great week everyone!

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

4 Tips for Small Space Gardening

4 Tips for Small Space Gardeners

Just because you lack large amounts of space does not mean that you cannot grow a lot of the fresh fruits vegetables and herbs you consume. As long as you have an area that receives at least 4 hours of sunlight daily, is easy for you to water, you should be good to go.  Here are a few tips to help you get great results with small space gardening:

GROW UP

One of the best tips for gardeners that lack space is to grow vertically. This is just as true in the fall as it is in the summer. In the summer months you can easily use a trellis to grow vining plants that yield plenty of fruits and veggies. In the fall, while there are not too many vining plants that grow in cooler temps, you can easily build a few levels of stairs (or purchase such a structure), and place your potted plants on them. Herbs grow great in this type of growing environment. Google “vertical planting wall” for some really cool ideas.

GO DWARF

Apartments, condos and smaller living spaces are great for dwarf fruiting trees. Many types of trees grow great in large containers and can be moved inside when the temps get too cold outside. There are columnar apple trees and dwarf lemon that fit this description. Most of these trees can be purchased for under $30.

WINDOW BOX GARDEN

Maybe you do not have a balcony. Consider a window box. A window box, is simply a box about 12 inches deep and the length of your window. You would attach it to your property just under the window by either screwing the box to the building itself, or using hangers so it hands from the window ledge. These are great because you can grow just about anything in them. Strawberries, lettuce, spinach and herbs all make for excellent choices for window box gardens.

UTILIZE RAILINGS

Does your balcony have railings? Then by all means attach some garden boxes to them also. They are unused space with plenty of airflow around them, and if you get plenty of sun, are perfect locations to grow a lot great tasting fruits and veggies.

Regardless of which option you choose, make sure you use a good potting soil that is equal parts peat/coir and perlite and double the amount of compost. Also be sure to feed your plants once a week with compost tea or a good organic fertilizer to make sure they are well fed and have the nutrients they need to grow and thrive in a confined space.

About the Author

mypic
Mike Podlesny is the author of the book Vegetable Gardening for the Average Person as well as the creator of the Seeds of the Month Club where members receive non gmo, heirloom variety seeds every month. You can listen to Mike each week on the Vegetable Gardening Podcast where he interviews gardening industry experts.

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared



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Can You Prep if You Live in a Tiny House?

Can You Prep if you live in a tiny houseThis post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

I’ve been reading a lot about the trend to build and move into a tiny house and I am fascinated by the stories.  I’m no stranger to downsizing, having lived in a 4,200 square foot home in a different time.  Now that I rent, I haven’t lived in anything above 1,400 square feet in a few years.

But the tiny house movement is different – many of these houses are below 500 square feet, and a lot of them are built on wheels.  I can see the advantages:

  • low utility bills
  • less stuff to keep track of
  • easy to clean
  • mobility
  • low cost
  • quick to build

I can also see the disadvantages such as less personal space, very little storage space, no room to entertain indoors and having to get rid of your possessions.

Can you prep if you live in a tiny house?

On one hand, much of prepping has to do with keeping keeping supplies such as water, food and gear.  “Two is one and one is none” is a common adage.  But if you live in under 500 square feet, you may have to re-think that.  Also, you may not have room for self-sufficiency activities that require additional storage space such as canning.

On the other hand, many of the tiny homes are also built off-grid, which gives you the advantage of being self-sufficient.  As long as you have sustainable and renewable energy and water sources, that is.

With a little creativity, I believe there are ways to prep while living in a tiny home:

  • Keep some of your supplies in an accessible storage facility or shed.
  • Have an underground cache containing your supplies.
  • You can keep your go-bag in your car or truck.
  • If you are building your tiny house, you can allocate some vertical space for storage.  You just have to be very choosy about what you store.
  • Prepping is not only about storing supplies but also about learning skills.  Acquire survival skills such as hunting, fishing, first aid, that do not require any indoor space at all.
  • Start a garden in an outside window box or empty space in the yard

When you think about it, there are always opportunities to prep no matter where you are.

© Apartment Prepper 2014