Read this Before you Toss out Expired Medications

Read this Before You Toss Out Expired Meds

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

I mentioned a few weeks ago I’d be clearing out and rotating my supplies.  Upon opening the first aid bucket, we found a lot of over the counter medications that were at or have reached their expiration dates.  The boxes and seals were unopened, so I was hesitant about throwing them all out.  So I reached out to our community experts, Dr. Joe Alton, aka Dr. Bones of www.doomandbloom.net and Dr. James Hubbard aka The Survival Doctor to find out their thoughts.  I gave them a list of the medications in my storage.  I did not expect a response from both, after all doctors are busy so I thought if I get one response it’ll be great.   I was fortunate to get a prompt response from both!   Both were fine about my posting their responses.  Here is what they said.

From James Hubbard, MD, The Survival Doctor

Most solid medicine stays good long past their expiration dates. Some studies have shown antibiotics, in particular, can be quite effective for several years. Usually, the worst thing that happens is the effectiveness of the medication gets less with time. I recommend buying medicines with the farthest expiration dates available, staying refreshed by using the ones closest to expiration date for everyday use, and immediately replacing those with a newer medicine. Store all in a cool, dry place. Moisture and heat can make many medicine deteriorate much faster than they otherwise would.
Here’s a link to a 2000 Wall Street Journal article. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB954201508530067326.html?dsk=y  The Shelf Life Extension Program (SLEP) is the study usually mentioned when citing prove that medicines last longer than their expiration date. And here’s another article that has tables that cite specific medicines and their extension times. http://www.ofcaems.org/ds-Stability_Profiles.pdf
Dr. Hubbard did suggest I could start a new supply and buy new ones remembering what I wrote above.
From Joe Alton, MD, aka Dr. Bones of www.doomandbloom.net   
Dr. Alton sent me a file:  http://www.ofcaems.org/ds-Stability_Profiles.pdf
listing the results of testing on expired medications.  He said, “It has all the meds listed, and I think it includes many of the medicines you mention in generic form. I would say this about aspirin: if it goes bad, it tends to smell a little like ammonia (just a personal observation on some very old meds).  Otherwise, I wouldn’t throw them away.”Here’s another article I wrote October 2012 about some interesting tests on some drugs found in a storage room of a pharmacy that were 28-40 years expired:

October 8, 2012 — An analysis of 8 medications indicates that most of the active ingredients they contain were present in adequate amounts decades after the drugs’ expiration dates, according to results from a study published online in the Archives of Internal Medicine. 

Lee Cantrell, PharmD, from the California Poison Control System, San Diego Division, University of California San Francisco School of Pharmacy, and colleagues used liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to measure the amounts of the active ingredients in the medications. The medicines, which had expired 28 to 40 years ago, were found in a retail pharmacy in their original, unopened packaging.

To meet US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards, an active ingredient must be present in 90% to 110% of the amount indicated on the label. Drug expiration dates are set for 12 to 60 months after production, even though many compounds can persist far longer.

In the new analysis, 12 of the 14 active ingredients persisted in concentrations that were 90% or greater of the amount indicated on the label. These 12 compounds retained their full potency for 336 months (Dr. Bones 28 years) or longer. Eight of them retained potency for at least 480 months (dr. bones: 40 years). Dr. Cantrell’s team was unable to find a standard for homatropine, 1 of the 15 ingredients.

Only aspirin and amphetamine fell below the 90% cutoff. Phenacetin was present at greater than the cutoff in Fiorinal (butalbital, aspirin, caffeine, and codeine phosphate, but was considerably less in Codempiral No. 3. The authors attribute the deficit in Codempiral to conditions that led to preferential degradation of phenacetin because of its amide group, compared with codeine, which is also in Codempiral but is more chemically stable.

Three compounds persisted in greater than 110% of the labeled contents: methaqualone (in Somnafac), meprobamate (in Bamadex), and pentobarbital (in Nebralin). These relatively high amounts may reflect degradation of other components of the compounded drug, the fact that the samples were produced before FDA-instituted quality control measures in 1963, or inconsistencies of the analytical techniques between when the drugs were compounded and now.

The new findings are consistent with the efforts of the Shelf-Life Extension Program, which has extended the expiration dates on 88% of 122 drugs tested so far. Extensions range from 66 to 278 months.  “Our results support the effectiveness of broadly extending expiration dates for many drugs,” the researchers conclude. They also point out that extending shelf life can significantly lower costs to consumers.

Limitations of the analysis, the investigators write, include an inability to confirm the storage conditions of the drug samples, as well as imprecise dating of the samples. The authors have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

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For the preparedness community, this information is very important, as it lends credence to what I have been telling you all along:  get your medical supplies together, and don’t throw out drugs in pill or capsule form just because they have passed their expiration dates. 

What did I end up doing?

I kept most of the bottles of aspirin and acetaminophen, rotated them for use now and bought fresh ones for the emergency supply.  I tossed out items that had changed in appearance and odor such as  liquids that appeared darkened, bottles that had tablets that were crumbling.

My thanks to Dr. James Hubbard and Dr. James Alton for their prompt and thoughtful responses.   The prepper community is fortunate to have their expertise to help guide us regarding these issues.

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

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If You’ve Always Wondered about Expiration Dates

Having started prepping a couple of years ago I am noticing that many of my supplies of medications are approaching their expiration dates.  We try to rotate our supplies, but invariably, some are going to expire.  I was wondering what to do when they get past their expiration dates when I received the following article from Joe Alton, M.D. aka Dr. Bones of www.doomandbloom.net:

New Evidence on Expiration Dates

by Joe Alton, M.D. aka Dr. Bones of www.doomandbloom.net
Pills
 
Over the years, I have expressed my opinions on the bogus nature of the expiration dates stamped on medications in pill or capsule form.  I have cited the findings of the Shelf  Life Extension Program, a program meant to investigate the possible usefulness of the millions of doses of various expired medications stockpiled by FEMA for use in peacetime disasters.
 
In my original article, “The Truth About Expiration Dates” 2 years ago, I indicated these findings were no longer available to the public.  Now, a breakthrough scientific article has been published in the respected journal “The Archives of Internal Medicine”.  Below is the article in its entirety, with important sections in bold type:
 
*******************************
 
October 8, 2012 — An analysis of 8 medications indicates that most of the active ingredients they contain were present in adequate amounts decades after the drugs’ expiration dates, according to results from a study published online October 8 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.
 
Lee Cantrell, PharmD, from the California Poison Control System, San Diego Division, University of California San Francisco School of Pharmacy, and colleagues used liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to measure the amounts of the active ingredients in the medications. The medicines, which had expired 28 to 40 years ago, were found in a retail pharmacy in their original, unopened packaging.
 
To meet US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards, an active ingredient must be present in 90% to 110% of the amount indicated on the label. Drug expiration dates are set for 12 to 60 months after production, even though many compounds can persist far longer.
 
In the new analysis, 12 of the 14 active ingredients persisted in concentrations that were 90% or greater of the amount indicated on the label. These 12 compounds retained their full potency for 336 months (Dr. Bones 28 years) or longer. Eight of them retained potency for at least 480 months (dr. bones: 40  years). Dr. Cantrell’s team was unable to find a standard for homatropine, 1 of the 15 ingredients.
 
Only aspirin and amphetamine fell below the 90% cutoff. Phenacetin was present at greater than the cutoff in Fiorinal (butalbital, aspirin, caffeine, and codeine phosphate, but was considerably less in Codempiral No. 3. The authors attribute the deficit in Codempiral to conditions that led to preferential degradation of phenacetin because of its amide group, compared with codeine, which is also in Codempiral but is more chemically stable.
 
Three compounds persisted in greater than 110% of the labeled contents: methaqualone (in Somnafac), meprobamate (in Bamadex), and pentobarbital (in Nebralin). These relatively high amounts may reflect degradation of other components of the compounded drug, the fact that the samples were produced before FDA-instituted quality control measures in 1963, or inconsistencies of the analytical techniques between when the drugs were compounded and now. The new findings are consistent with the efforts of the Shelf-Life Extension Program, which has extended the expiration dates on 88% of 122 drugs tested so far. Extensions range from 66 to 278 months.
 
“Our results support the effectiveness of broadly extending expiration dates for many drugs,” the researchers conclude. They also point out that extending shelf life can significantly lower costs to consumers.
 
Limitations of the analysis, the investigators write, include an inability to confirm the storage conditions of the drug samples, as well as imprecise dating of the samples. The authors have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.
 
 
**************************
 
For the preparedness community, this information is very important, as it lends credence to what I have been telling you all along:  Get your medical supplies together, and don’t throw out drugs in pill or capsule form just because they have passed their expiration dates.  We are anxiously awaiting lists of the 122 drugs that the Shelf Life Extension Program has tested, but you can expect them to be medications that will be useful in the aftermath of a catastrophe.
 

Joe and Amy Alton are the authors of the #1 Amazon Bestseller The Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Handbook.  See their articles in Backwoods Home, Survivalist, Self Reliance Illustrated, and Survival Quarterly magazines, and at their website at www.doomandbloom.net
Twitter:  @preppershow
Facebook:  drbonesand nurseamy
Doom and Bloom Hour Podcast on blogtalkradio.com

http://bepreparedradio.com/viewshow.aspx?id=4d1c4bcc4c874d2d88beaf27e713b959

 
 
In conclusion...  I will not be throwing out my expired medical supplies for now.  I’ll be awaiting the findings about those 122 drugs and will share with you as soon as I hear the results.  Our thanks to Dr. Joe Alton for sharing this article with us.
 

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