Substitutes for Toilet Paper

Substitutes for Toilet Paper

I recently posted about being off-grid for 48 hours, and using a lot of baby wipes due to the lack of water during our adventure.  One thing that would run out quickly in a survival situation if you did not have a huge stockpile would be toilet paper.  Not having a lot of space we have about three months worth on hand right now, but that can run out quickly.  Also, a large stockpile of toilet paper is not portable in a bug-out situation, and in a shelter in place scenario, the TP supply is bound to run out.

Space saving tip:  Remove the cardboard insert and flatten the roll and you can fit more rolls in a small space.

What are some substitutes for toilet paper?

Back in ancient times, the Romans used a sea sponge on a stick.  They would clean themselves with it, rinse it in the running water (public bathrooms had them on the floor) and leave it soaking in salt water in between uses.

In colonial times, people used corncobs, and later, old newspapers and catalogs were used in outhouses.

Here are a few ideas:

1.  Wet wipes or baby wipes

These would work just like toilet paper, but again, a large stockpile would have to be accumulated.

2. Paper Substitutes

Newspaper may work, but the ink would turn everything black.   I read other people prefer The Yellow Pages but these days, a lot of people don’t keep phone books around.  Store catalogs may be more common, and flimsy pages instead of high end glossy paper would work best.  Just crumple up the sheet until it softens up, then wipe.

3.  Cloth

Cloth, such as wash cloths, terry cloth or  cloth diapers can be used as toilet paper substitutes.  You can even cut up old, soft t-shirts into squares.  If you want to make reusable cloth wipes, this article from Food Storage Moms has good instructions.  The method would be to wet the cloth, wipe, then launder the cloth.  Supporters of this idea feel that most people would have nothing against rewashing cloth diapers, therefore personal washcloths should be okay.  I would think it would be a good idea to throw the soiled wash clothes into a bucket of water with some bleach before washing.

4.  Plant material

Sage leaves are said to be soft and fragrant enough to use, some say banana leaves would work too..  You must have some knowledge about which plants are safe; you would not want to use something like poison ivy, poison oak or sumac by mistake!   Remember: Leaves of three – let it be!

5.  Water

Many countries already use a spray water fountain called a “bidet” as part of their bathroom facilities.  Since this is being considered in an emergency scenario, we would need an alternative to that too.  In many countries, use of the left hand in combination with pouring water in a pan or small bucket with the right hand is the way to clean up.

Possible water carriers:

Fill any of these containers with plain water, add a drop of essential oil for fragrance and wash up.  (Don’t use mint or and don’t overdo the quantity of drops, or you may irritate those sensitive areas.)  After washing, dry the area with a clean towel that can also be reused.

To avoid disease, one would have to wash the hands well with water or antibacterial gel right after.

I’m not ready to give up toilet paper but you gotta do what you gotta do to stay clean.   In an emergency, the water route seems like the most likely one to try.  I may try making those clothes one of these days.  We will keep stockpiling toilet paper for now, and store them efficiently by flattening them for maximum use of space.   Another idea would be to decrease the use of toilet paper by combining with the methods above, thereby extending the life of the stockpile.

Toilet paper shortages sounds unlikely, but it has happened:  a year or so ago, Venezuela faced a toilet paper shortage and the government had to take over a toilet paper factory.   Before I got interested in preparedness, I can recall snagging the last package of toilet paper and waiting in a long line right before a hurricane.  Toilet paper is one of the first items to disappear if a disaster disrupts supply deliveries.  It’s good to know some alternatives just in case.

 

Financial Emergency: 12 Ways to Raise Cash

Financial Emergency  12 Ways to Raise CashThis post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Everyone faces the need to raise cash at some point: the car breaks down, unexpected medical bills, legal troubles etc.  It can get so dire that rent gets behind or utilities such as water and power are being threatened with disconnection.   Pretty soon, TV or radio commercials singing the virtues of payday loans start to sound tempting.

If you find yourself starting to wonder whether a payday loan may help you in the short run, stop right now.

  • Payday loans have outrageous interest rates.
  • If you fail to make the payment or need to re-borrow, those interest rates are going to be even higher: there have been cases where borrowers end up paying $1100 for a loan that was originally $250, leaving them in a cycle of debt slavery.
  • These loans are designed to keep the borrower in a downward spiral.

 

What to do if you find yourself with no credit, and need to raise cash quickly

  1. Evaluate why you need the money right away. Sometimes, a bill that is perceived as an emergency may not be as urgent as originally thought.

Utilities such as electricity, water and gas are urgent, but the cable and cell phone bill are not as crucial.

Most utilities also allow you to make payment arrangements if you need to move the payment to align with your paycheck. Be up front with them and explain your circumstances. When the time comes, you must stick to the arrangement to avoid disconnection.

For medical bills, doctors and hospitals are also happy to accept monthly payments.

2. Go through your belongings and find things you can sell.

· Hold a garage sale.. If you live in a building that does not allow garage sales, join forces with a friend who can hold one.
· List your items on Craigslist or Ebay.

3. Return unused items that still have the price tags.

I’ve seen friends’ closets that contain outfits they bought but never wear, and still have the price tag on after several months. Many department stores will accept returns, but be aware they will refund the money if paid in cash, but if paid by credit card they return it to the card. Some stores will only issue a gift card, but this brings me to the next tip.

4. Sell your unused gift cards for cash. You’ll have to sell them at a discount, but you’ll get cash for gift cards you haven’t used.

Try Gift Card Granny http://www.giftcardgranny.com/sell-a-gift-card/

5. Hire out your services on Fiverr

The jobs start at $5 a “gig” but as services get added, the cash could add up. I’ve used them for small jobs, and each time I spent at least $25 and I’m the frugal type. If you act professionally and deliver quality work within the time agreed upon, the jobs could add up.

6. Get a part-time job or create a side job: Start a pet sitting or dog-walking service, tutor kids after school, teach a skill or sport.

7. Collect and sell aluminum cans and other recyclables.

8. Pawn or sell valuables at a pawn shop.

9. Sell your handmade crafts on Etsy, swap meet or craft fairs.

10. Make money during your down time on Amazon Mechanical Turk https://www.mturk.com/mturk/welcome

11.  Rent out your car to someone else.  Most cities have peer to peer car sharing services such as Relay Rides  I haven’t personally tried this, but have read some car owners can make an average of $250 depending on the schedule.  Make sure you investigate thoroughly as to how it works, and what your protections are.

12.  Try borrowing from a peer to peer lender.  Peer to peer loans are unsecured personal loans from other people, facilitated by a lending intermediary that may charge a one-time fee.  Again, investigate all aspects and read the fine print before getting into anything.

If you are in a cash crunch, try one or a combination of the above tips.  Pretty soon, you’ll have the cash you need to get by.  Keep your spirits up, and never lose faith that “this too, shall pass.”

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

 

Get Rid of Cable = Save Money for Preps

Today we returned the cable boxes and unhooked ourselves from Comcast cable.

It all started out when we moved to a smaller unit a few months ago (part of the plan to downsize).   We weren’t on a contract but we had one of those “bundled” plans that was discounted.  At the same time, we were aggravated by their service issues.  We realized that out of roughly 200 channels, we were really only watching a handful.

Here are a few ideas on getting shows:

20130827_163109 - CopyMohu Leaf TV Antenna - Copy

  1. An indoor HD TV antenna or a regular antenna allows you to get all the free channels.  Cost is around $12 for “rabbit ears” antenna or $36 for an HD antenna, and the monthly cost is $ 0.
  2. Get shows via Hulu and Netflix, at a fraction of the cost.  Cost is around $7.99 for either one if your TV is a newer model and allows the access.
  3. Watch shows directly from the networks via internet.  Cost= free.
  4. The Roku 3 is small box that is connected to the TV that lets you stream shows from Netflix, Amazon Instant Video or Hulu Plus; accessing 1000+ channels and growing.   Initial cost of the Roku 3 is $89, monthly cost depends on what services you subscribe to.

For us, getting rid of cable saves $70 from the monthly bill.  Currently we are on Option 1 but may consider adding services later.  Even adding a small monthly $7.99 bill from Netflix is still only a fraction of what we were spending.

If you are wondering how you might find some savings for the emergency fund or buy some preps, consider cutting out cable TV.    Small steps you can take:

  • Evaluate your family’s viewing habits for a week.
  • Write down the channels you most often watch.  I bet most of those channels are not being used.
  • Do some research on what’s available, talk to the family, then decide.

With all the alternatives available, I am certain we won’t miss it at all.

 

© Apartment Prepper 2014

 

 

Save Money! Make Soda at Home

Make Soda at Home

This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com

Although I like an occasional glass of Coke, I prefer a glass of sparkling water with a twist of lemon or lime.  La Croix Sparkling Water was a regular item on the grocery list. Until we spotted the Soda Stream and started to calculate whether it would save us money.  After adding up what we spend on sparkling water, we figured we’d recoup the cost of the Soda Stream in four months.   I won’t go into the calculation, as your mileage may vary depending on how much soda you buy in your household.  (This is not an ad for Soda Stream-we have no relationship or affiliation.)

For anyone who has wondered about this, here is how it works.  Soda Stream comes with a unit, proprietary C02 canister that fits within the unit, and bottle.  The starter pack also came with small flavoring samples.

Soda Stream and bottle

  1. Fill the bottle with plain water.  We like to chill the water before using.
  2. Remove the cap off the bottle and screw it on the Soda Stream unit.  The newer models no longer have to be screwed on, but we have the older model so that is what I will describe.
  3. Push the top button 4-5 times until you hear a buzz.  (The instructions say about 2-3 times but that did not make it fizzy enough.)

Adding CarbonationRemove the bottle and add your flavoring.  I like a squeeze of lime or lemon.  We tried out the sample flavors that came with it – I personally only liked the root beer flavor, but did not care for the cola or lemon lime.   We’ve also tried adding a bit of apple or orange juice and that worked well.

Advantages:

  • Less waste than buying soda or sparkling water weekly
  • You control how much sugar you are drinking.
  • Much cheaper than store bought soda
  • No need to run to the store!

Disadvantages:

  • The C02 canister refill runs about $15 if you return the old canister.   We’ve traded ours in at the Walmart Customer Service center.  We use the unit once a day, and one canister lasts us about 2-3 months.
  • You cannot carbonate anything besides water.  I’m fine with this, as I even like just plain fizzy water.

I know there are alternatives to the Soda Stream, but for the space that we have, and the rate of consumption, it suits us just fine for now.

But if you are interested in those alternatives, here are a couple:

Brew Better Soda at Home  I may try this one next.

How to Force Carbonate at Home  This sounds more cost effective, although it has a higher upfront cost, but I don’t have the space for a large unit like this yet.

© Apartment Prepper 2014

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Are We Headed for Economic Hard Times?

Food Line Great Depression

Lately, I’ve been noticing a lot of dire predictions about the economy.  Whether they happen as predicted or not, it’s a good idea to pay attention to these signs.

This article for Modern Survival Blog caught my eye:

Major Stock Market Crash In January

If you look at the chart, the patterns between today’s stock market and the time period leading up to the Great Depression (1928-29) look uncomfortably similar.

Then I saw this one from SHTFPlan.com:

15 Signs That We Are Near The Peak Of An Absolutely Massive Stock Market Bubble

You can even find concerns from mainstream sources  Take a look at

Be Prepared For Stocks To Crash 40%-55%

Even Clark Howard who offers practical financial advice weighed in:

Is a stock market crash coming?

It’s Too Close for Comfort

Last week, right before Thanksgiving, it was announced at work that management had done some “restructuring”  and a few employees were laid off.  Those of us who were fortunate to have a job were asked to increase our workload to “add value” to the team.   I felt relieved to have a job, but felt bad for the people who lost theirs.

What is your Economic Crash Plan?

Think about your own worse case economic scenario:  for many it’s the loss of income.  Hopefully, unemployment benefits would cover in the event of a job lay-off.  However, expenses would have to be cut back drastically.

  • How long would your emergency savings last- how many months or rent or mortgage can you cover?
  • Start using emergency supplies to avoid having to buy food.  Find out about food banks and other services that can offer help.
  • Can you borrow from retirement plans?  In a crash, you need to take care of the present and keeping a roof over your head.
  • Consider which relatives can you move in with, if you had to.  As undesirable as the possibility might be, remember it’s only temporary and it would still be better than being homeless.
  • If you don’t have relatives you can move with, can you live in a truck or RV if you had access to one? 

It is hard to even consider these ideas, but this mental exercise will help you plan and cope better should your financial fortune take a turn for the worse.

What you can do now

I am hoping everything continues along as normal, and nothing happens.  But just in case, it is a good idea to implement a few good habits now, while there is time.

  • Build your emergency cash fund by using your skills to earn extra income
  • Go through your unwanted items.  Donate or sell them to make room for supplies that you do need.
  • Don’t go overboard with Christmas spending.  Set a limit for gifts, decorations and entertainment and stick to it.  Pay cash for everything.  Using a card makes it easy to overspend.
  • Look at each non-essential bill and decide if you can do without it:  gym memberships, premium movie channels, etc.  If you are not using it, consider getting rid of the service (but be mindful of contract terms and penalties.)
  • Learn to cook more meals at home, you will feel healthier by avoiding fast food, and you’ll save money.
  • Cut down on discretionary spending now, and send the extra money to savings.
  • Build good relationships at work and in your industry.
  • Stop incurring new debt, pay down debt if you can.
  • Stock up on food and supplies while you can
  • Get your checkups, prescriptions, eyeglasses and any elective medical procedures while you have health insurance
  • Learn survival and self-sufficiency skills now.

These measures can only help your finances in the long run.  Prepare while you can.

 

Camping Survival

Camping Survival

 

 

Prepping Items at the Dollar Store

I passed by a new Dollar Tree so I thought I’d check it out.  I had visited the 99 Cents Only Store a while ago, and wanted to see if there were items I could pick up to add to the stockpile.  I took photos of various items that caught my eye.

Water

Spring water was going for $1 per gallon, which is cheaper than our supermarket, where a gallon is going for $1.25.  I run tap water through the Berkey and fill up empty soda bottles, but if you are just starting out you need to build a stockpile of water.   Picking up a couple of gallons of bottled water a week until you have at few days worth of water to start is a good idea.

Canned goods

CannedveggiesThe canned goods were on sale at $0.79.  They had a good selection of canned corn, mixed vegetables, green beans, peas etc.  I normally see them around $1.25 on sale at the supermarket.  Don’t forget to check the expiration dates, and buy only the ones your family will eat.

Paper goods

paperplatesPaper plates, plastic utensils and cups can come in handy during an emergency when you have no water to wash dishes.  They are also good to have for “everyday emergencies” such as a last minute party at the school or a potluck at work.  These are not a bad deal for a dollar a pack.

As for toilet paper, I thought you can get a better deal at discount stores such as Walmart or Target, or even the supermarket when they go on sale.

Personal care

I thought the best deals were on personal care.

Floss

Floss (55 yds) for $1.00 is a good price – I saw the same one at the pharmacy for $1.79.

The cotton swabs were also a good.

I wouldn’t recommend the pain relievers, the ones I saw were close to expiration:  February 2014 is much too close.

Miscellaneous

Nylon Rope

They had some nylon rope, which is good to have, but is usually overlooked.  At the last hurricane we used one to secure a tree branch to keep it from falling over.

GlowsticksGlow sticks are also good to keep at a handy location during a sudden power outage.  They last a few hours, and are entertaining for kids.

Sponges and steel wool were also in abundance, so I picked up a few.

I also spotted safety pins, clothes pins (in case you have to hang laundry out to dry), mini sewing kits – items that I usually forget to pick up at larger stores, but know I will need.

I believe that anyone can slowly build a stockpile, even with just $5 a week, as long as it’s done consistently.  Not everything is a great deal at the dollar store, but as long as you keep track of pricing and always check expiration dates, it is a worthwhile place to check for prepping supplies.

 

 

Water is one of the biggest needs when it comes to survival.  Whether bugging out or sheltering in place, you can never have enough clean water for survival: For your water purifier needs, please visit:

 For beginning preppers

Good ideas for building a food storage plan can be found here:

DebtProof Living

 

Self-Sufficient Saturdays: How to Make Banana Muffins without an Electric Mixer

Banana muffin1

Welcome to the latest Self-Sufficient Saturdays feature, where we try out projects that can easily be done in an apartment.

Breakfast muffins are a staple at our house for busy weekday breakfasts.  I used to buy them at the store until I found out how easy it is to make muffins yourself.  There are no special ingredients, and you can rescue overripe, black bananas from getting thrown out.

Just one problem:  my cheap hand mixer that I’ve had for six years finally gave up.

My original recipe required an electric mixer to blend all the ingredients.  Creaming butter and sugar just does not work well without one.   I’ve tried it, and the results were not great.  Through trial and error, I finally found a muffin recipe that works well with hand mixing.  Here is the recipe.

Mushy bananas1

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 ripe bananas
  • 1/3 cup melted butter
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour
  • 3 tbsp sour cream or plain yogurt (I used the homemade kind)
  • Optional:  paper muffin cups to line the muffin tin, OR use cooking oil to grease the muffin tin

Directions:

1.  Preheat the oven to 350°F.  Line the muffin tin with paper cups if you are using them; otherwise, grease the muffin tin with cooking oil.

2.  Mash the bananas with a fork in a large mixing bowl.

3.  With a spatula or large spoon, mix the melted butter with the mashed bananas.

4.  Mix in the sugar, egg, and vanilla.

5.  Sprinkle the baking soda and salt over the mixture and mix in. Add the flour last and keeping mixing.  You can tell it is well mixed when you no longer see any dry powdery lumps.

Scooping muffin mix1

6.  Pour the mixture into the muffin tin. Tip:  The easiest way to do it is by using an ice cream scoop to pour the muffin mix into the muffin cups.

7.  Bake for 30 to 45 minutes.  My oven gets very hot so it only takes about 35 minutes so check often.  You can tell the muffins are done when you poke with a fork and the fork comes out clean.   I plan to buy a solar oven one of these days, (as soon as the budget allows) and this will be one of the first recipes I plan to make in a solar oven.

These muffins will stay fresh in the fridge from one to two weeks.  But they may get eaten way before then!

 

Home Remedy for Sinus Allergy Sufferers

Sinus Rinse IngredientsMy allergies have started bothering me, with itchy, watery eyes, early morning congestion, sneezing, signaling the start of the fall allergy season.

At my last physical check-up my doctor asked me if I’ve had any health issues bothering me, and I did mention my sinuses bother me every fall and spring.  I can always tell the seasons by my chronic sinus congestion.  I told him I already take antihistamines, but sometimes they don’t help, and I don’t really want prescription inhalers if I can avoid it.  A fellow allergy sufferer himself, he recommended I try the new nasal rinses in the market.  I told him I was not successful with the Neti-pot, but he said the new ones are actually just sinus rinses that work by spraying.  This is the one I tried:

sinusrinseI gave it a try, and it actually gave me some relief.   I used up the pre-made packets, but instead of buying more, I am making my own.  After doing a bit of research, I found a mix that works.  (Please note this is for informational purposes only and not intended as medical advice.  Check with your own doctor before trying out any health remedies.)

Here are the ingredients:

8 ounces lukewarm distilled water (DO NOT USE TAP WATER or any other water except distilled)

3 tablespoons non-iodine salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

Mix all together, fill in a sterile bulb syringe and use as a nasal spray.  (Discontinue use if you feel any irritation/ discomfort or if it doesn’t work for you)

So far it’s worked for me and it does not feel any different than the store bought kind.  I am still keeping a few of the pre-made packets for emergencies and travel, but for now, I am using the homemade version.  I still keep the antihistamines handy, but in an emergency, I am glad I have a backup remedy for nasal allergies.

 

 

Get the real deal. Whether bugging out or sheltering in place, you can never have enough clean water for survival: For your water purifier needs, please visit:

 For beginning preppers

 

DebtProof Living

Preps versus Debts

Bills

Bills bills bills

A friend, let’s call her Cathy, called me about buying items for her stockpile while she was shopping at Costco.  We went over beans, rice, sugar, canned foods, toilet paper and others good bulk items.  Cathy told me she’d call me back after she got through the check out line.  Not even 30 seconds later, she called back telling me how mortified she was that her credit card was declined and she had no other way to pay.  I tried to make her feel better but I don’t think it worked.  We hung up soon after, as she left her cart of bulk items behind, muttering something about getting a drink on the way home.  I felt bad for her – it is awful to get told that in front of a whole line of people.

I had no idea she was having issues with debt; it is not the sort of thing that is usually discussed with friends or family.   I think many people are in denial about being debt, just as they are in denial about the need to prepare.

It is unfortunate my friend was not able to get the bulk items just as she was getting started but I think she can start by prepping in small steps.  When someone finally wakes up and feels the need to prepare, it is often accompanied by panic.  Thoughts about not having enough money to get all the gear you think you need fill your mind, and these thoughts might make you even more paralyzed.

How do you find money to prepare, while you are also trying to dig yourself out of debt?

Make a spending plan. 

On one column, list your income.  On the opposite column, list your expenses including rent or mortgage, utilities, food, gasoline then list your debts, and possibly savings.  Your income less expenses should have a small amount left, and you can allocate that to prepping.  I believe you can prep even if you start with $5 a week, as long as you do it consistently.

Stop charging.

I have seen advice or comments in other sites saying just run up the credit cards and buy all the emergency supplies even if it’s on credit.  I’d stay away from doing making additional charges, because that just sinks you further and further into the pit of debt.  In a year or two, if nothing happens, you will still be in debt and you will just blame yourself even more.

It is hard to put the cards away, but that is the only thing that works.  If you don’t carry it in your wallet, and it’s out of reach you are less likely to use it.  Switch to using cash only.

Try to get more money coming in.

There are lots of ways to make some money on the side.  Consider moonlighting, or making money from hobbies.  For more ideas, see Coming Up with Cash for Preps

While technically not getting more money coming in, using coupons increases your stockpile at a lower cost.  See Extreme Couponing to Boost your Supplies.

Learn Self-Sufficiency Skills

Part of prepping is learning to be more self-sufficient and many of these skills can be learned for free.  Start now by visiting my section on Self Sufficiency  

I encourage you to try out even just one project a month, and you will end up saving some money.

What about Emergency Cash?

I would say as long as you are current on your bills, and are able to set aside a small amount for water, food and emergency supplies, then you should do so.  Having a small amount set aside for emergencies will help you avoid relying on credit cards then next time you need to replace a tire, pay for an emergency room visit or other unexpected expense.

Get help and inspiration.

If you are trying to recover from credit card debt, these sites offer excellent advise on  giving debt free living advice:

http://www.daveramsey.com/home/

Debt-Proof Living

Both sites have a members area, however, the free side is excellent and gives enough information to get started.   I am not affiliated with any of these sites, I just know countless people have benefited from following these steps.

I also like the Surviving and Thriving blog by Donna Freedman, which features a bit of everything but also has some great advice about living well on a small budget.

If you are new to this site, please check out the “Getting Started” tab  as well as Saving Money

Being prepared for emergencies and having a small stockpile of your necessities will actually save you money in the long run.

 

 For low-cost ways to prep:

 

For easy ways to become more prepared, read my book:

Debt-Proof Living

Stock up on these Emergency Storage Items Now

Summer is a great time to boost your food storage and emergency supplies, while the schedule is a bit slower and you have more time to comparison shop.  With the warm weather,  it is also prime yard sale season in many areas across the country.

Now is the time to shop end of summer sales on camping equipment such as tents, sleeping bags, outdoor lighting, outdoor cooking accessories, summer clothes and footwear, and backpacks.

Here are a few deals I’ve come across:

Condiments: Ketchup, BBQ sauce, mustard, relish and other condiments, salad dressing

Outdoor cooking:  Barbecue accessories, charcoal

Snacks:  Potato chips, canned dips (Don’t forget comfort food!)  Back to school items such as pudding cups, canned lunch meat, juice, hot and cold cereal will soon go on sale.

Seasonal Produce:  If you can or dehydrate foods,  take advantage of plentiful and inexpensive fruits and vegetables such as pears, berries, corn, garlic, grapes, onions, peaches, bell peppers, plums, potatoes, zucchini, tomatoes, green beans.

Toiletries such as insect repellant, sunscreen, hand sanitizer

Other supplies:  Paper plates, cups and disposable utensils, Clorox wipes.  Even though I do not normally use disposable dishes and wipes, these supplies come in handy in an emergency such as a hurricane, when water may be scarce.

Don’t forget to check out the weekly flyers at discount stores such as Walmart or Target, CVS and Walgreens so you can combine the weekly sale items with coupons from the paper or found online.

With gas prices on the rise, prices on a lot of necessities are sure to increase.  It makes sense to take advantage of good deals while they’re available.

 

ReadyMade Resources is a trusted source for your preparedness supplies: